HIST113 Study Guide - Final Guide: Barter, John Molson, Deindustrialization

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Published on 18 Apr 2013
School
University of Waterloo
Department
History
Course
HIST113
General course themes
1) Role of gov/state
- partnership of business and the state
- political concerns not always allied with business
2) importance of “staples” or raw materials in business and history of Canada
- business and economy basd on development and export of raw materials
shaped issues ike technology, banking, social structure
3) more complex than “staples” thesis?
- for example- industrialization
- manufacturing hasn’t just purely come from explotation of raw materials
4) Importance of foreign or international business influences
- dependence on forign business
- forign ownership
- “world economy” (trading to French empire, some of asia)- trade, capital flow,
technology, ideas
5) importance of “entrepreneur?
- entrepreneurial enterprise in canadas history? fur trade, gold
- limits to opportunity
- climate, geography, population (smaller market, demand, skills in labor force)
Fishing- The First Business
“discovery” of north America
Factors leading to European Exploration
- growing power of kings (need to maintain the power, and protect it, and
trying to generate wealth to help protect gold, spices- ) , Build empires and
claim land where its wealthy, pursuit of creating colonies
- changes in business and trade activity
- technology advances- old and new, move thru the world and acquiring these
technologies such as shipping (3 mass ships instead on one mass) latitude
and longitude
- commercial “revolution” changes in commerce and trade, trade over wider
range of products and further places around the world
“matthe” – Cabot’s ship
Leads to exploration , expansion, trade
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Discovery of fisheries of north America- Bristol fisherman(probably discovered) or
john cabot(reported it to the king)?
“newe founde launde” and the grand banks
Fish- important resource to European society. Very profitable, fish is very popular
for Europeans to eat, less costs than raising cattle
Growth of fishing
Nature of the business:
- “free” enterprise anybody can fish there for free, any country/person who
wants to., no license’s or fees,
- merchants (lenders/investors, captain) and fisherman(don’t get paid until
the end, like profit sharing)
- funding (multiple investors, over several ships, so it is a safer investment)
Risk
- merchants and investors
- fisherman (theft, skills to run the ship)
- pirates, and naval ships will steal from fishing ships including the fisherman
and switch them to the navy instead
- in the early 1600’s there started to be ship insurance
- storms (1 in 50 don’t make it back from them)
“wet” fishery
- processing of the fish is done on the boat (cut of head and clean it) and hasn’t been
dried yet, so more salt is needed
Dry Fishery
- becomes the dominant method
- cheaper
- on land almost like an assembly line, drying stages in the sun with salt (less)
- nicer product to eat because less salt involved
Nature of fish processing
- fishing stage used to dry fishery ca. 1710, Frech woodcut, unknown artist
Fishing and settlement
- settlement and colonization
- not nessesary for fishing trade!
- Exploration continues for wealth (gold,silver). ex. Jacques cartier travel
inland using st Lawrence river
- Factors leading to settlement in newfoundland because it might be easily ,
more competition in the coves, protect and claim a cove,
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- Factors against settlement monarchy sometimes didn’t allow it
(kings/queen) , since it was free enterprise the investors didn’t want to
invest in something
- Ex Ferryland 1638 , liscense was given by English king, but was not allowed
to interfere with fishing industry there
The Fur Trade early 1500’s-1800s
Part One
Important Themes
Fur Trade Begins Europeans arrive to fish on east coast, approached by
natives who use furs and want to trade, natives wanted metal products like
knives or pots,
Why Interest in Trading Furs? valuable for clothing industry in Europe,
Little to no communication all around Canada, how can you trust someone?
Europeans
Fashion Beaver Felt Hats (most prized/valuable fur, waterproof and warm)
Everyone wore hats back then and men didn’t leave the house without them,
same with a lot of women, occupation/status figure
Native Peoples
Initiated Trade Why? natives need metal,
Natives are already used to trading
Native NOT driven by wealth, must wanted necessities
Wanted booze and guns, and glass beads
The Fur Trade
Fur Trade and Settlement in NA:
Settlement Result of Goals of Kings
Partnership of Kings and Traders
The the early years they met just down the st lawernece river at Tadousac
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Document Summary

Political concerns not always allied with business: importance of staples or raw materials in business and history of canada. Manufacturing hasn"t just purely come from explotation of raw materials: importance of foreign or international business influences. Climate, geography, population (smaller market, demand, skills in labor force) Very profitable, fish is very popular for europeans to eat, less costs than raising cattle. Free enterprise anybody can fish there for free, any country/person who wants to. , no license"s or fees, Merchants (lenders/investors, captain) and fisherman(don"t get paid until the end, like profit sharing) funding (multiple investors, over several ships, so it is a safer investment) Processing of the fish is done on the boat (cut of head and clean it) and hasn"t been dried yet, so more salt is needed. On land almost like an assembly line, drying stages in the sun with salt (less) Nicer product to eat because less salt involved.

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