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CLA204H5- Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam ( 30 pages long!)


Department
Classics
Course Code
CLA204H5
Professor
Catherine Rubincam
Study Guide
Final

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UTM
CLA204H5
FINAL EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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Classical: refers to Roman and Greek society and any other society in contact with them
Classis: arrangement
Logos: has reason to it
Can become a collection of utterances with meaning (a story)
Oral in nature
Have different versions
Mythos: an utterance, may have no meaning
May use exaggerations
"Myth becomes a lie when you mistake a symbol for reference"
A metaphor, not a simile/ comparison. Not a lie
Mythology mythopoeia: creation of myths
They take place in the past (the time before time)
"All religion is the manifestation of the mask of god"
Problem: mistaking different personas with the actual identity (of the god)
Religion is based on myths:
Seen as true
Aitia: cause of nature
It is aetiological: explains the cause of things - PHYSIS, science equivalent back in
the day
Explains sociological conditions or institutions
It can be a charter of nature -NOMOS, equivalent to societal rules
Didactic in nature = it teaches
Myth is…
What is a myth?
1.
Divine myth: involve gods and their rights
Greek legends involve gods
2.
Legends: stories about people. Based on historical fact
E.g. The Little Red Riding hood
They haver clever humans with unusual circumstances, talking animals, etc.
They have motifs: themes that drive the story
3.
Folktales: stories for entertainment
3 types of myth:
There is no right version of a myth
Oedipus was abandoned as a child because of a prophecy: "he will kill his father
and marry his mother"
He did kill his father and married his mother BUT without knowing they were
related t him
Background:
He goes into exile with his daughters
Sophocles: Oedipus blinds himself because he realizes what he's done.
Written ~400 years before Sophocles'
Homer: Oedipus remains king until old age
Both versions are right
Versions:
E.g. Oedipus
Greek myths: have givens (an assumed part of the story the audience is supposed to know because
of context)
Types of evidence:
Lecture 1
January 5, 2017
3:31 PM
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E.g. sculptures, temples, etc.
Material: physical remains created by humans to represent history
1.
Written versions of a myth are frozen
2.
They reference something unknown because of lack of context
Incomplete stories
3.
We have fragments: at least 60% of writing is lost
Problems:
Sometimes literary evidence lacks something shown in the material one
Literary: writings
Types of evidence:
Freud: suggests that components of myths are reflections of the unconscious
Jung: agrees with the reflection of the unconscious. Myths have archetypes
Propp: archetypes are in all stories
"Mysterium tremendum et fascinans": tremendous mystery and fascination
1.
Mystical: they produce a sense of awe. They tackle incomprehensible matters
Cosmo: world/ universe
They why of the world
2.
Cosmological: how the world was put together
3.
Sociological: to tell you your place in society
Pedagogy: education
4.
Pedagogical: people learn the purpose of life through myths
Myth has 4 main functions:
Campbell: all myth is cross-cultural
Why are there myths?
Has periodization
To be continued on the next lecture
Greece: ~3000 B.C.E. to ~476 C.E.
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