SOC244H5 Study Guide - Midterm Guide: Middle Age, Life Satisfaction, Westermarck Effect

144 views31 pages
Published on 15 Nov 2016
School
UTM
Department
Sociology
Course
SOC244H5
Professor
SOC44 Midterm November 6
Professor: Weiguo Zheng
** Although the midterm should cover chapters 7, 8, 10-11 the slides after the
midterm cover chapter 7, 8 and 9
Chapter 7: Family life course
Duvall, E.M. (1957). Family Development
- Stage 1: Married couples (without children)
- Stage 2: Childbearing families (oldest child, birth-30 months)
- Stage 3: Families with pre-school children (oldest child, 2.5-6 years)
- Stage 4: Families with schoolchildren (oldest child, 6-13 years)
- Stage 5: Families with teenagers (oldest child, 13-20 years)
- Stage 6: Families as launching centers (first child gone to last child leaving
home)
- Stage 7: Middle-age parents empty nest to retirement
- Stage 8: Aging family members (retirement of death of both spouses)
Three basic assumptions of family developmental theory
1. Family behaviour is the sum of the previous experiences of family members
as incorporated in the present and in their expectations for the future.
2. Families develop and change over time in similar and consistent ways.
3. Families and their members perform certain time-specific tasks are set by
them and by the cultural and societal context
Five basic themes of the life course perspective:
1. The importance of multiple temporal contexts;
2. Social-structural context;
3. Diachronic process and change;
4. Heterogeneity and
5. Multidisciplinary assessment
- A life course perspective emphasizes the importance of time, context, process
and meaning of human development and family life
Time influences relationships in 3 ways
- Life experiences influence relationships
- Family events and family transitions influence individuals and interactions
- Historical time events in the broader social context influence roles and
values
Childhood and parenting
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 31 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
Childhood
- The term, childhood is generally recognised as a socially constructed
phenomenon. Chronologically, childhood has been variously described as:
the period from birth to 6 or 7, when the child can articulate clearly; birth to
when the child can reproduce; birth to when the child can work; and birth to
when the child can live independently of the parents
- According to the United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child (1989),
childhood spans birth to the age of 18
Images of Childhood
- Children as natural innocents
- Children as monsters
- Children as miniature adults
- Children as economic assets
Childhood and Parenthood: The Varieties of Experiences
- Premature Births and Low Birth Rates
- Childhood Poverty
- Young Parents: Teen Pregnancies
o Difficulties for the Parent
o Difficulties for the Child
- Single Parents: Unmarried & Divorced
o Unmarried Parents
o Divorced mothers
o Divorced fathers
- Older parents
o Trends in Delayed Childbearing
- Minority Parents
- Non-traditional Parents: Single Fathers, Relatives, & Gays & Lesbians
o Single Fathers
o Grandparents & Other Relatives
o Gays & Lesbians
- Working Parents
o Career-Parenting Conflict
o Family-Oriented Workplace Policies
o Child-Care Services
o Making time for Children
Social complexities of raising children
- Beating your children
- 5 gay parenting myths
Parenting styles
- Authoritative - Parents who are both demanding and responsive. They
impart clear standards for their children’s conduct. They are assertive, but
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 31 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
not intrusive or restrictive. Their disciplinary methods are supportive rather
than punitive. They want their children to be assertive as well as socially
responsible, and self-regulated as well as cooperative
- Authoritarian Parents who are demanding and directive, but not
responsive. They are obedience and status-oriented, expecting their orders
to be obeyed without explanation. They provide an orderly environment and
a clear set of regulations, monitoring their children’s activities carefully
- Permissive Nondirective parents, who are more responsive than they are
demanding. They are lenient, do not require mature behaviour, allow
considerable self-regulation and avoid confrontation
- Rejecting-neglecting Disengaged parents who are neither demanding, nor
responsive. They do not structure and monitor their children’s behaviour,
and are not supportive. They may be actively rejecting or neglect their child-
rearing responsibilities altogether
Gender and Parenthood
- Motherhood
o Mothering is instinctual?
o History: Wet nursery, breastfeeding
- Fatherhood
o Father’s involvement in childrearing
o Men can be effective mothers
Middle Years
The Middle Years of the Family
- Middle age is the period of life beyond young adulthood but before the onset
of old age.
- Various attempts have been made to define this age, which is around the
third quarter of the average life span of human beings
- Middle life for parents considered the years between the ages of 40 and 64
is a period of re-evaluation for their life course so far
- By the end of the middle years, many members of the younger generation are
independent or are planning to leave their parent’s homes
Change and Diversity of Mid-life Families
- Changing demographics
o Among women who were born in 1840, for example at the age of 40,
and the women died, on average, at the age of 62. Men, typically, did
not live long enough to see their last child reach adulthood
o As many as one-quarter of the adult female population at the turn of
the 20th century never married
o Women born in 1960 had life expectancy of 82 years
o Of those aged 50%, only 16% would have had one or more surviving
parents in 1910, compared with 60% in 1991. Of those aged 60, only
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 31 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in

Document Summary

** although the midterm should cover chapters 7, 8, 10-11 the slides after the midterm cover chapter 7, 8 and 9. Stage 2: childbearing families (oldest child, birth-30 months) Stage 3: families with pre-school children (oldest child, 2. 5-6 years) Stage 4: families with schoolchildren (oldest child, 6-13 years) Stage 5: families with teenagers (oldest child, 13-20 years) Stage 6: families as launching centers (first child gone to last child leaving home) Stage 7: middle-age parents (cid:523)(cid:498)empty nest(cid:499) to retirement(cid:524) Five basic themes of the life course perspective: the importance of multiple temporal contexts, social-structural context, diachronic process and change, heterogeneity and, multidisciplinary assessment. A life course perspective emphasizes the importance of time, context, process and meaning of human development and family life. Family events and family transitions influence individuals and interactions. Historical time events in the broader social context influence roles and values. The term, (cid:498)childhood(cid:499) is generally recognised as a socially constructed phenomenon.

Get OneClass Grade+

Unlimited access to all notes and study guides.

YearlyMost Popular
75% OFF
$9.98/m
Monthly
$39.98/m
Single doc
$39.98

or

You will be charged $119.76 upfront and auto renewed at the end of each cycle. You may cancel anytime under Payment Settings. For more information, see our Terms and Privacy.
Payments are encrypted using 256-bit SSL. Powered by Stripe.