Ch6.docx

10 Pages
124 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC 253
Professor
Brandt
Semester
Spring

Description
Chapter 6 Who was Clarence Darrow? Lawyer  Very flamboyant, Scopes monkey trial. Most famous trial: Two wealthy teen boys, wanted to see what it would be like to kill someone, lured a 10  year old boy into car, beat him to death, tried to cover the crime scene. Tracked one boys glasses back to  them, got a confession.  Argued for 12 hours for the boys’ lives.  Civil vs. Criminal Law Civil laws are concerned with the definition, regulation, and enforcement of rights in non­criminal cases in  which both the person who has the right and the person who has the obligation are private individuals.  The burden of proof is a preponderance of the evidence (greater weight of the evidence) in civil cases, as  opposed to beyond a reasonable doubt. Unlike criminal cases, private parties must initiate civil cases. Tort A private wrong that causes often times physical harm to another You’ve been harmed, want compensation.  Criminal Courts Determine whether a defendant is guilty. Decide the sentence for those who are guilty. This is done within and according to a complex and ewer­changing network of laws, personnel, and political  change. Criticisms of Courts Police – offenders are treated too leniently Corrections – lack of room for new inmates and severe sentences. Public – unfathomable machine that fails to provide justice when lawbreakers are released on technicalities. Legislators – unable to provide resources to handle huge case loads. Offenders/victims – do not believe the court is dispensing justice in a fair manner. Taking the Blame Courts have no control over –  How they are financed How many cases are sent Available resources to carry out sentences Public image Dual Court Systems The political division of jurisdiction into two separate systems of courts; federal and  state. In this system, federal courts have limited jurisdiction over state courts Everyone manages cases in their own jurisdiction. Federal cannot just come in and overrule states. (Weed  ruling) State Courts  State supreme court Intermediate Appellate Court Court of appeals. If appealed from there, goes to state supreme court.  Trial Courts of General Jurisdiction Trial Courts of Limited Jurisdiction Most states have at least a three­tiered system; trial, appellate and state supreme courts. Colorado’s intermediate appellate court consists of 16 judges serving eight­year terms.  The court sits in  three­member divisions to decide cases.   Federal Courts US Supreme Court US Courts of Appeals  Federal District Courts State Court Development—Early Court Systems  Massachusetts Bay Colony “General Court” Pennsylvania Referee System Original Jurisdiction vs. Appellate Jurisdiction Original Jurisdiction The authority of a given court over a specific geographic are or over particular types of cases.  This is  referred to as “falling within the jurisdiction”. Not always geographical­Certain courts have jurisdiction involving children, military, etc. Appellate Jurisdiction The lawful authority of a court to review a decision made by a lower court. State Court Systems Today State Trial Courts Lower Courts  Trial Courts Lower Courts – Limited Jurisdiction ­ Municipal / County Courts hearing relatively minor cases involving  misdemeanors, traffic, etc. Trial Court – General Jurisdiction – District Courts having jurisdiction to hear any criminal case.  May allow  defendants to have a Trial de Novo upon appeal from a lower court. State Appellate Courts Authority to review the proceedings and verdicts of general trial courts for judicial errors and other  significant issues. Most states have an appellate division which is an intermediate appellate court or Court of Appeals and a  high­level appellate court or state supreme court (court of last resort). Appeal A request that a court with appellate jurisdiction review the judgment, decision, or order of a lower court and  set it aside or modify it. Can appeal on any procedural violation, due process violation, basically process violation. Cannot just  appeal because youre innocent. Courts of Limited Jurisdiction State courts of original jurisdiction that are not courts of record, such as traffic courts, municipal courts, or  county courts. State Courts of General Jurisdiction Also called general trial courts. State courts of original jurisdiction that hear all kinds of criminal cases. Federal Court Systems US Supreme Highest court in the U.S. judiciary system. The court rules on the constitutionality of laws, due process  rights, and rules of evidence. The rulings are binding on all federal and state courts. Final say in the  interpretation of the Constitution.  US Courts of Appeal US District Courts The Federal Court System is the three­tiered structure of federal courts, involving US District courts, US  courts of appeal, and the US Supreme Court. Landmark Cases U.S. Supreme Court cases that mark significant changes in the interpretation of the U.S. Constitution. Virtually changes the way we do business within the CJ system.  Miranda Case, Terry v Ohio, etc.  Clearer guidance for system The Supreme Court of the US  Chief Justice of the US:  Serve for life President selects Supreme court justices, confirmed by senate, who can not confirm, doesn’t happen often.  The US Supreme Court
More Less

Related notes for SOC 253

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit