Study Guides (248,413)
United States (123,380)
Economics (74)
All (20)
Final

ECONOM 1014 Exam Study Guide

12 Pages
137 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics
Course
ECONOM 1014
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 1  Section 1  What is economics­ Economics is the study of how people make decisions or choices  when faced with  scarcity  The Scientific Method­ the method used to determine things in economics  We Have a question, we want an answer  Second we must engage in hypothesis and observation of the world around us  Third we need to test our hypothesis  Fourth we may need to go back and revise our original hypothesis  Natural Experiment­ occurs when in everyday life something happens and we are able to collect data to  allow us to compare peoples behavior before or after the event  Normal goods­ goods that people buy more of when they experience an increase in income (new cars)  Inferior goods­ goods that people buy less of when they experience an increase in income (used cars)  Model­ collection or system of our well established rules  Behavioral economics­ combines psychology and brain imaging to better understand the decision  making process and better improve our models  What is the purpose of models­ designed to help us make better predictions  Section 2  Economists often disagree with one another on many issues  A positive statement­ a statement which is potentially testable and provable.  REMEMBER THAT­ positive statements are potentially testable and provable even though they may  be wrong  Normative statement­ one that is not potentially testable or provable.   A normative statement can be identified by   Using words, ought, should, good, bad, fair, unfair, etc.  These statements depend on peoples definition of standards and other things.  Section 3  Every science has their own particular jargon  Words are often imprecise and do not give enough information   Section 4  The field of economics developed becasuse people have to make choices as a result of scarcity  Scarcity­ means that there is not enough of something to satisfy everyone who wants some  We must find a way to ration these scarce resources   We use price as a rationing device  The scarcer the good is, the higher the price is; and the higher the price is, the greater the incentive to  me to produce more  Debeers diamonds is an example of causing demand in the market for a product that is scarce.   Section 5  Needs­ food, housing, clothing, air, water, etc  Wants­ TV, cars, Jewelry,etc  Our wants are unlimited  We are forced to make choices in order to determine what we should buy, or pass on.  Opportunity cost­ scarcity causes us to make choices and making choices results in lost opportunities  and these lost opportunities represent the cost of our choices  You must be careful when determining next best opportunity since it is not always limited to one lost  opportunity  Section 6  Rules for how the world works  We generally believe that people are rational  Rational­ people make their decisions in a consistent manner  We assume everyones rational decision making goal is to make yourself as happy as possible  Economic Surplus­ happiness, welfare, benefit  Cost benefit analysis­ You considered the benefit you feel you would get from something compared to  the costs that you will have to pay for the good  Things to note about cost benefit analysis  The list will be different for every person  Your list will be based on your expectations  We can get you to change your decision by offering incentives  Economists use a unit of measurement called util which measures the amount of utility we get from  choices made  Section 7  We assume that people make their decisions on the margin.  On the margin­ we generally make a small decision, evaluate whether that was still the right  the decision  to make and so on and so on.   Expected marginal economic surplus= expected marginal benefit + expected marginal costs  Section 8  Good decision making requires us to ignore sunk cost  People make this mistake all the time with stocks. They refuse to sell stocks below the price which they  purchased the stock, even though they could reinvest the stock into a better performing stock and make  up for their sunk cost.  Section 9   Though the goal of society is to maximize the happiness of society, we cannot possibly satisfy  everyone’s needs but the goal is to use our resources as efficiently as we can so that we can create the  greatest well being for our society. – we refer to this as maximizing the Economic pie.  Economic Efficiency­ creating the greatest amount of wealth as possible for our society  Equity  Efficiency  The problem with attempting to divide the economic pie more equally is that it actually shrinks the size of  the economic pie.  Section 10  The economic question is:  What to produce?  How to produce?  Who gets what is produced?  Production efficiency­ means that given the resources we have available how do we best use them  Consumption efficiency­ means that, of the goods and services we have chosen to produce, how do we  decide who will get them?  Produce what people want most  Command economy­   Letting people bid on items in the free market, the more you desire it.  Pick the lowest cost producer  Competition is good for the consumer because we’ll see it results in lower prices for us and competition  is good for society because it results in less waste of resources  Profit is often a signal in the free market that the producer is the efficient producer and bankruptcy is  often the signal in the free market system that the producer is not the efficient producer  Monopoly­ situation where there is only one producer of this product   Labor intensive­ using lots of workers and very little machinery  Capital intensive­ very few workers and a lot of machinery   Make sure goods and services go to those people who value them the most  Adam Smith called the father of economics, described the workings of the free market system as one in  which there seemed to be some invisible hand directing things so that the right goods got produced  Section 11  We only do things if the expected marginal benefit is at least as great as the expected marginal cost  The most important job for the government with respect to the economy with respect to the economy is  defining and protecting property rights  We have a market failure due to imperfect information  Externality­ an externality exists when a consumption or production decision impacts people other than  the actual consumer or producer and that consumer or producer ignores the impact on other people  Private cost benefit analysis is trying to do what’s best for me without considering what is best for  society overall  Positive consumption externalities because they come about from your consumption decision, and  because they positively impact others and because you ignore them  We will let the government try to induce you to internalize the externality through pigovian  taxes/subsidies    The best subsidy amount will be exactly equal to the externality  There are four classifications of externality we have to consider. Positive consumption, negative  consumption, positive production, and negative production  Negative consumption externality is a side effect from something that you do that negatively affects  others that you do not consider when making the decision.  The best pigovian tax amount is exactly equal to the externality  Negative production externality­ any time a producer pollutes it is a result of the production process, it  hurts people around the producer and the producer ignores it when deciding on how much to produce  Positive production externalities­ occur whenever the production process benefits people around the  producer and this benefit is not included in the producers private cost benefit analysis.  Chapter 2  Section 1  Markets exist whenever there is at least one person who wants to buy the product and at least one  person who wants to produce and sell the product  Sect
More Less

Related notes for ECONOM 1014

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit