Study Guides (248,578)
United States (123,442)
Psychology (252)
PSYCH 100 (85)
Dr.Love (4)
Midterm

Psych Exam 2.docx

10 Pages
78 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 100
Professor
Dr.Love
Semester
Fall

Description
Psych Study Guide • Visual Information Processing ­Parallel Processing: doing it simultaneously, what/where is it moving at the same   time. ­Ventral Stream: contains a flow of visual information about “what” we’re looking at  in our visual field. ­Dorsal Stream: contains a flow of visual information about “where” it is located. ­you can damage one, and the other can be intact. • Processing Color Vision ­Subtractive Coloring: removing wavelengths of light being reflected, such as when  you mix colored paints. ­Additive Coloring: increasing wavelengths of light being reflected from the surface  with mixing colored lights. ­Young and Helmholtz Trichromatic Theory: 3 important colors: red, blue, and  green. Describes processing at Retina level,  but not cortical.  Flaws: after images ­Karl Hering’s Opponent Processing Theory: colors are paired together in an  antagonistic fashion: red with green, blue  with yellow. Best Describes central  processing. • Theories of Hearing ­Theories of Pitch: ­Place Theory: organ of corti, specific place on that membrane vibrates. ­Frequency Theory: pitch related to vibration speed of basilar membrane. ­Which Theory is true?: Frequency theory for lower pitch, place theory for high  pitch. ­Volley Principle: for frequencies in between. • Consciousness ­Sleep Deprivation: ­Impact: Mood: irritable  Attention and Alertness: Reaction speed slow Problem Solving and Reaction Micro sleeps: only a couple of seconds of sleep, can’t control whe it  happens. ­Example: Randy Gardner(1965): 11 days without sleep, he was delusional,  experienced hallucination, monotoned. ­Sleep Rhythms ­Circadian rhythm: 24 hour bodily rhythm ­Zeitgebers: cues to help entrain our rhythm (train body into 24 hour cycle)  Example: sun ­Free running cycle: slightly longer, roughly 25 hours. ­Suprachidsmatic nucleus: internal clock tells people wake up/fall asleep  (wrist watch in brain), associated with dawn and  dust.  • Why We Sleep ­Preservation Adaptive Theory ­Preservation and Protection: animals evolved sleep patterns to avoid  predators by sleeping when predators are most  active.  ­Other Theories ­Memory Storage Theory: allows us time to consolidate and organize our  memories. ­Restorative Theory: Provides us a point where cells can repair after  extended usage. • Measuring Sleep,  ­Polysomnigram (left and right eye movements, muscle tension (EMG), brain waves  (EEG)) ­Stages of Sleep:  ­Pre­Sleep: Beta Waves (smaller and faster): person is wide awake and  mentally active.          Alpha Waves (larger/slower): person is relaxed or lightly sleeping ­Non­REM: Stage 1: Theta Waves­ light sleep lasting roughly 10­15 minutes         Stage 2: temperature, breathing and heart rate decrease, speed  spindle and k complex.         Stages 3 and 4: Delta waves: deepest points of sleep with delta  waves present.  ­REM: REM­ rapid eye movement: active stage when dreaming occurs EEG patterns resembles a wakeful state (paradoxical sleep) Muscles still relaxed (REM sleep disorder: get up and act it out) REM rebound can occur, we need REM body requires. • Sleep Disorders ­Dysomnias: difficulty with initiating or obtaining sleep or excessive sleepiness  ­Continuity: staying asleep ­Latency: how long it takes to fall asleep ­Parasomnias: problems related to sleep stages ­Insomnia: primarily involves difficulties with initiating and or maintaining  sleep. May be caused by a number of factors, from anxiety to  behavioral patterns. Treatment is based on cause, but drug  treatments are usually GABA agonists (warm milk: dysomnia). ­Sleep Apnea: intermittent periods of suffocation during sleep, leading to  continual interruptions of deep sleep (dysomnia). Can lead to  strokes. Nighttime and daytime symptoms (headaches fatigue,  daytime napping, very loud snoring). Treatment can include  change in diet, surgery, or use of a CPAP( continues positive  airway pressure) ­Narcolepsy: excessive daytime sleepiness that leads to strong uncontrollable  urges to take brief naps. General symptoms also include cataplexy,  hallucinations (usually visual), and sleep paralysis. Narcoleptics  also struggle with getting a restful night sleep. Cause is not known,  but possibly genetic in some cases. Treatments generally include  stimulants.  Ex. Kid interview on the news CNN. Anthony who sleeps every  chance he gets. Never well rested, cataplexy (randomly collapse,  come on by emotional excitement).  Narcoleptics don’t have hypocretin.  ­Nightmares VS Night Terrors (parasomnia) ­Nightmares: Time: Late in cycle State when waking: upset, scared Response to care: comforted  Memory: vivid recall of dream Return to sleep: usually rapid Sleep stage during which event occurs: partial arousal from  deep NREM (SWS) sleep. ­Night Terrors: Time: within 4 hours of bed time    State when waking: disoriented, confused    Response to care: unaware of presence     Memory: none, unless fully awakened    Return to sleep: delayed by fear    Sleep stage during which event occurs: REM sleep. ­Sleep Talking (parasomnia) ­Developmental (happened when younger) ­Stage 1 or 2 of sleep, beginning. ­Ex. Dion McGregor, in REM stage, would narrate own dream. Recorded them. ­Sleep Walking (somnambulism, parasomnia) ­generally occurs in deeper stages of sleep (stage 3 or 4) ­definitely should wake them (ex. girl climbed crane at construction) ­appears to be developmentally linked ­REM behavior disorder ­lack of muscle paralysis during REM sleep leads the person to act out their  dreams.  ­More common in the old age ­treatment includes GABA agonists (primarily inhibitory) • Why we dream ­Aspects of dreaming ­psychoanalytic approach: dreams are a mechanism for wish fulfillment ­Manifest content: reflects the dream itself and what happens (teeth falling  out) ­Latent content: underlying true meaning of the dream (teeth symbolize      power structure so dream is fear of control and authority) ­Cognitive Theory: dreams can be used to analyze and potentially solve  problems. ­Activation Information Mode Model: dreams are relatively random, but  involve daytime experience. • Learning ­Classical Conditioning ­Ivan Pavlov: ­1849­1936 ­Russian physiologist ­discovered classical conditioning through his study of salvary  reflexes with dogs ­Unconditioned stimulus: a stimulus that elicits a reflexive response in the  absences of learning. ­Unconditioned response: a reflexive response elicited by a stimulus in the  absence of learning.  ­Conditioned stimulus: an initially neutral stimulus that comes to elicit a  conditioned response after being associated with an  unconditioned stimulus.  ­Conditioned response: a response that is elicited by conditioned stimulus, it  occurs after the conditioned stimulus is associated with an  unconditioned stimulus.  ­Contiguity VS contingency ­Temporal contiguity theory: responses develop when the interval between  unconditioned stimulus and conditioned stimulus is  very short.  Backward conditioning? ­Contingency Theory: association was dependent upon the perceived  predictability of the conditioned stimulus  of the  unconditioned stimulus. ­Rescoria and Wagner’s study ­2 types of trials ­Format A: tone▯followed by shock ­Format B: tone with light ­▯followed by a shock ­Randomized trials ­Principles of Conditioning ­Generalization: a new stimulus resembling the original elicits a response  similar to conditioned response. Ex. Pavlov dogs or dentist drill. ­Discrimination: learning to response to certain stimuli and not others.       Extinction and Spontaneous recovery ­Higher Order Conditioning: procedure in which a neutral stimulus becomes  a conditioned stimulus through association with an  already established conditioned stimulus.  Ex. Dave Matthews (reminds him of bad ex  girlfriend)  ­Learning to Fear: Applications ­Fears and Phobias ­An 11­month old boy named Albert was conditioned to fear a white  laboratory rat. Each time Albert reached for the rat, Watson made a loud  clanging noise right behind Albert. Albert’s fear generalized to anything  white and fuzzy (rabbits and Santa Clause)  ­Applications of Conditioning  ­Counter Conditioning: the process of pairing a conditioned stimulus with a  stimulus that elicits a response that is incompatible with an  unwanted conditioned response.  ­Mary Cover Jones (mother of behaviorism) collaborated with Watson and did the  same experiment with Little Peter. ­Conditioned Taste Aversion (food poisoning) ex. Ramen Noodles.  ­Psychological Conditioning: Ex. Pupil Dilation ­Place Conditioning: Physiological, Drug overdosing. ­Learned Helplessness ­Learned helplessness: tendency to fail to act to escape from a situation  because of a history of repeated failures.  ­Classic Study ­Real­Life Applications ­Operant Conditioning ­Operant Conditioning: voluntary behavior learned through consequences. ­Edward Thorndike’s Law of Effect: responses followed by pleasurable  consequences are repeated, followed by  unpleasant consequences will not be  repeated. ­Thorndike’s puzzle box: placed a hungry cat inside a “puzzle box” and the  only escape was to press a lever located on the floor  of the box. Cats don’t like being confined, and there  is food outside the box so the cat is motivate
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 100

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit