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ANTH 266 Study Guide - Spring 2019, Comprehensive Midterm Notes - Climate Change, Intergovernmental Panel On Climate Change, Greenhouse Gas


Department
Anthropology
Course Code
ANTH 266
Professor
Jen Shaffer
Study Guide
Midterm

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ANTH 266

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January 31, 2019
Anthropological Questions of Climate Change
Key Contributions:
Ethnography-long term
Historic perspective-human environment relationships
Holistic lens-climate change interacts
What is anthropology?
Holistic study of humankind and their closest relatives through space and time
Linguistics
not climate change, but “weird weather we are having” on the eastern shore
papers
Structure, evolution, slang
Biological/Physical anthropology:
adaptations our bodies have to cold for example, we would shiver to get blood
flowing and warm up muscles by contracting and relaxing
Not just humans, but food sources and animals
Fossils in the past were different, gives us an idea of what conditions they were
in and how their conditions caused them to lose or gain certain structures
Archaeology
study of past cultures and material remains
how have people responded to climate changes in the past?
changes in food, changes in social structure
the way that people move depending on the environment they live in, how they
interpret changes in the environment today
Sociocultural anthropology
looking at cultures and societies, asking them how climate changes has affected
their ability to do their jobs and live their livelihoods
Awareness to how other cultures are responding/adapting to climate change,
how it is affecting their agriculture
Applied Anthropology
how do you take that theory and use it in the real world to solve real problems
Health issues arising due to climate change, may provide more incentives for
action
History of Climate-related research
Archaeology: how past societies reacted to changes in climate
Tikal
Babylonia
Medieval warming period, Vikings expanded to other, warmer places
(founded Kiev), Greenland settlement disappeared at the end of the
warming period
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Ecological/environmental anthropology: How livelihood activities respond to shifts
in climate patterns and major climate events
Sami reindeer pastoralists, Finland/Russia
Irrigations systems, requiring a governing system
Resource management and local environmental knowledge
Contemporary focus on climate
Cultural values and political relationships shaping knowledge and interpretation
Inform how we respond to ongoing change
Historical record and context that influences perceptions and debates
Some norms for places may be very different for other places
Holistic understanding of social-ecological systems
Including social, economic, and political pieces in ecological system
changes
Place-based community research
Document observations, perceptions, and responses
Investigate how climate change undermines culture and livelihood
Learn about local climate/weather knowledge
Understand community resilience
Assist with disaster and displacement-before and after
Explore resource management under climate change
Examine human rights and human security, including climate science and policy
creation processes
Improving ethnography
Multi-sited
May work on a pacific island, and then work on the capitol and do
research there, always thinking about that first small community
Global-local scales
How are they connected
Collaborative
With the people you are working with, no one likes to be studied
Asking what problems they are experience, how we can develop a project
to help alleviate those problems
Critical
Where can things be improved so no one is harmed
What constitutes adaptation (money)
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January 5, 2019
Challenging Climate Cultural Values and Perceptions
Historic Climate Contributions to Climate Discourse
Current climate change framings and discussions rooted in historic exploration
and exploitation
Impacts policy development and money spent
Text is a broad term
Critiques:
Indigenous populations have been involved, but have not participated in certain
discussions
Geopolitical power that these regions hold
Why did westerners want to explore…
The arctic:
Resources (oil, walrus ivory in viking times)
A place to conquer, not a big force of defense
Research
Low-lying islands:
Rich with resources (spices, food)
Potential for tourism
Farming land
Deserts:
Increase strength in trade
Entertainment for western society (artifacts for museums)
Timbuktu (magical, undiscovered)
Mountains:
Military strategy or infrastructure
Various ecosystems for many different resources
Human-induced environmental harm not questioned
Spiritual component when climbing mountains
World War 2 effects on
Low-lying islands:
Testing would destroy communities and nature (radiation)
Relocation of people from homes
Sea level rise due to industrialization
Arctic:
Rising temperatures melted ice
Inuit Solar Council created
Nuclear waste goes to poles
Deserts:
Desertification due to droughts caused by greenhouse gases
Tanks would drive on desert lands, killing plants and erosion
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