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BSCI 201 Study Guide - Fall 2018, Comprehensive Midterm Notes - James Vi And I, Boston, American Promise Film


Department
Biological Sciences Program
Course Code
BSCI 201
Professor
Justicia Opoku
Study Guide
Midterm

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BSCI 201
MIDTERM EXAM
STUDY GUIDE
Fall 2018

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

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Ighani 1
Mehrnaz Ighani
Professor Sandy Kreller
HIST 111
18 January 2017
The Impact of Dr. Benjamin Church on The Revolutionary War
Benjamin Church was a physician, author, poet, and someone who had many positive
contributions during the Revolutionary War. Dr. Church was born in New Port, Rhode Island
who attended Boston Latin School and Harvard College. He learned about medicine from Dr.
Joseph Pynchon and became a surgeon known for his attention to details and skills. Church
supported the Whig cause, formed in opposition to the policies of President Andrew Jackson, strongly,
but it is said that he parodied the patriotic songs in favor of the British. He examined the body of Crispus
Attucks, the first person killed in the Boston Massacre, 1770, and his deposition was printed in the
narrative of the town. He is said to have written for the Loyalist paper, The Censor, and many committees
of correspondence. Known for his writings, Church was a member with Adams and Warren of a
committee of correspondence and he was appointed to draft a letter to the other towns about the colony’s
rights. Church continued in the confidence of the Whigs with Dr. Joseph Warren and others and he was
appointed a delegate in 1774 to the Provincial Congress. In May 1775, he went to consult the Continental
Congress, Philadelphia, about the defense of the colony. He was elected director and chief physician of
the first Army Hospital July 1775. Unfortunately, in October 1775, Church was found guilty of holding
criminal correspondence with the enemy because of the letter he sent to the commander of a British vessel
Newport. The Massachusetts Provincial Congress expelled Church even though he tried to defend
himself by saying that he was not acting disloyal. He stated that he was trying to frighten the British and
end hostilities. The Continental Congress decided to imprison him, but because of illness, he was
removed to Massachusetts and put on parole not to leave the colony. I was fortunate enough to interview
him and ask questions about the services he provided during the Revolutionary War. By reading the
following, you can gain insight into his experiences and what he has done for our country.
Q: Why did you partake in pre-rebellion patriot affairs with the British?
A: I partook in pre-rebellion patriot affairs including the making of war plans and the buying and
secreting of arms. I was a spy in the service of the British General Gage because I needed funds to
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Ighani 2
support my lifestyle.
Q: Who influenced you to start pre-rebellion patriot affairs?
A: My English wife definitely influenced my political opinions. To be honest, I liked the idea of United
States being an independent country, but I didn’t want to be enemies with the King and the motherland
England.
Q: As the director of the first American army hospital, what was your power and what things were you
able to control?
A: I was appointed as a director by the Continental Congress and the position gave me unlimited access to
American military access and to the knowledge of military leaders.
Q: What services did you provide during the Battles of Lexington and Concord?
A: I stood at the side of the patriots because I felt that they truly trusted me so I did not want to let my
people down. I served as the patriot surgeon general and performed many operations on wounded
Americans. I wish there were more physicians and better tools to speed up the process, but my team and I
tried our best.
Q: How did you react to your imprisonment by the Congress?
A: The prison environment was difficult for me because I suffered from severe asthma. In January of
1776, I wrote a letter to Congress seeking leniency because my severe asthma was life threatening, but
they moved me to another jail.
Q: Didn’t the Congress exile you to the West Indies as a response to your request?
A: Yes, you are correct. In 1780 Congress exiled me to the West Indies, not to enter America again. At
that point I was regretful that I made wrong decisions by being disloyal to my country, but I hope I was
able to help as many people with my medical knowledge during those critical times.
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