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Study Guide

FMSC 330- Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam ( 36 pages long!)


Department
Family Science
Course Code
FMSC 330
Professor
Zeiger
Study Guide
Final

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UMD
FMSC 330
Final EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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Functions of the family
Marriage
Family a married couple or group of adult kin who cooperate and divide labor among gender
lines, raise children, and share a common well place
Dates back to prehistoric times
Has maintained the roles of
o Produce and socialize kids
o Acts as a unit of economic cooperation
o Assigns status and social roles to individuals
o Provides a source of intimacy
MODERN SOCIETY
Modified many of these functions
Makes some of the functions difficult to perform
Recent changes of marriage in family are adjustments
o Divorce
o Single parent
o Working mothers
o Marriage equality
Single parent family
Egalitarian splitting roles in the family as equally as we can and not having roles based
on gender
Dual-worker marriages
Dual-earner
Dual-career
Child-free marriages
4 functions of the family things like technology, industrialization mobility alters the way a
family performs its functions. While these are the basic functions families are supposed to fill,
they do not always fulfil them all nor do they fulfil them well
1. Produces and socializes children
Reproduction and socialization the family makes society possible as they replace members of
society as the older members die off. The development of techniques that have been called
artificial insemination has separated reproduction from sexual intercourse, and made it possible
for infertile or gay couples to have children. Children are helpless and totally dependent for years
following birth. Teaching a child how to be human and fit in to their particular culture is one of
the families most important task. Virginia Satir wrote a book called Peoplemaking on the role
of socialization in a family. Traditionally, the family has taken the role of socialization but this
has changed. With the rise of compulsory education, the state has become responsible for that of
children over the age of 5, reducing the role of family in socialization. As many as half of the
children between the ages of 3 and 5 may be in nursery school, daycare, or kindergarten and
even while children are at home, television instead of their family may be raising them.
Watching television is the most important activity for most children up to the age of 14. About
45% of children aged 4 to 6 said they preferred television to daddy
2. Acts as a unit of economic cooperation
Economic cooperation the family divides labor along gender lines. The division of labor
among gender lines has been universal and what made marriage necessary. Although division of
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labor is essential of all cultures, the actual work varies from each culture. There’s no reason the
roles can’t be reversed, because the roles are assigned by culture not biology. The division
of work among gender lines made genders interdependent. Women who work outside the home
are more likely to get a divorce. Although the family no longer produces as much goods as it did
in the past, it still provides services.
3. Assigns status and social roles to individuals
Status we learn the ways of our class to identify with our families. In blue collar families, we
learn that work is merely done to earn money or to support the family. In middle class families,
you are taught that work gives you a source of success or failures, and we see that work and
family may compete for loyalties. Our families also give us our racial or ethnic identities. In
addition, they provide us with a religious tradition. These identities help us form our cultural
values and expectations.
Social roles equally as important. During our lifetimes, we will belong to two families, family
of orientation (or origin; the family in which we grew up) and family of choice (previously
family of procreation). Much of our identity is formed in these two families. In our family or
orientation were given the role of son, daughter, or sister. In each of these roles, we’re expected
to act in such ways. Sometimes our feelings fit the expectations of our roles, other times they do
not. The family roles of offspring and sibling are most important when we are living with our
family of orientation. These roles change as we grow old as we leave our family of orientation.
Being an adult in society has been marked by a change in family roles and move from
adolescence. When we assume the role of husband, wife, or spouse, we assume entirely new
roles and responsibilities. As parents, we assume a lifelong obligation and parental roles change
dramatically as the child ages, but these roles are the most enduring only second to gender
identity.
4. Provides a source of intimate (emotional) relationships
Emotional and intimate are primarily the same thing in this instance. “Only an animal or a God
can live alone” Many studies have shown us that divorced and single people appear to be the
least healthy, and in other studies we find that loneliness is correlated with disease, drug abuse,
and suicide. Studies on the role of pets in human relationships suggests that the most prized
aspect of pets in their attentiveness to their owners, their welcoming and greeting behaviors, and
their role as confidines. For adults, especially for men, they are outlets for touching, act as
companions and a social catalyst. Dog owners are more likely to interact with strangers. The
need for intimate relationships, whether they are satisfactory or not, may hold unhappy
marriages and relationships together indefinitely because loneliness is a very terrible fear.
Among the newly divorce, the loneliness might be the worst aspect of the marital breakup.
Marriage and the family furnish emotional security and support. In the larger world around us,
we’re generally perceived in terms of our roles. It’s only among our intimate relationships that
we are seen on a personal level. Before marriage, our friends are part of our intimate
relationships.
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