Get 2 days of unlimited access
Study Guides (350,000)
US (190,000)
UCLA (2,000)
Study Guide

[M E STD M50B] - Midterm Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam (12 pages long!)


Department
Middle Eastern Studies
Course Code
M E STD M50B
Professor
Professor Westbrook
Study Guide
Midterm

This preview shows pages 1-3. to view the full 12 pages of the document.
UCLA
M E STD M50B
MIDTERM EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

M50B Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam: Biblical Theory
I. Features of Judaism: Jewish Law (Halakha)
A. Halakha traces to Torah, Talmudic writings, and later rabbinic writings (Mishnah)
1. observance of Sabbath as the day of rest/high holidays
2. daily prayers-morning, afternoon, evening
3. clothing/coverings
4. observance of kosher
a) Discussed in Leviticus 11
b) Refers to kosher foods being fit or proper to eat-today Rabbis
inspect food/factories and deem them Kosher
c) Kosher foods include cows, goats, albacore, anchovies, bass,
flounder, chicken, goose, turkey, duck- Unkosher foods include
pigs, rabbits, mussels, clams, shrimp, shellfish, owl, hawk,
vultures
d) Animal must be slaughtered “humanely- the animal cannot die of
natural causes
B. Leviticus:17-26
1. “Holiness” codes related to ritual purity/impurity, health, and membership
in covenantal community
2. Used to establish boundaries between Israelites and other peoples who
don’t have a covenantal relationship with God
3. Examples concerning:
a) Sacrifices
b) Necessity of burnt offerings
c) Prohibition against consumption of blood
d) Regulations about sexual relations
e) Business arrangements
4. Some of these scriptures are taken out of context
5. Penalties are listed up to/including death
a) Typically the punishments for the “abominations” listed weren’t
actually carried out
(1) “Abominations” in the Bible are not things that are seen as
innately wrong, they are just against Hebrew tradition/belief
(2) Ex. Leviticus 18:22 says that homosexuality is an
abomination punishable by death, but people aren’t
actually executed in practice
II. Moving Beyond the Torah: Nevi’im (prophets)
A. Theme of covenant is very important in this section of the Bible
B. King David
1. Identified as second King of Israel and Judah (Saul being the first)
2. Known as a “warrior king” because he was an underdog and beat Goliath
3. Considered as a messiah meaning he is an “anointed one”- anointed with
oil by the prophet Samuel
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

4. God’s covenant with David- 2 Samuel 7:4-17
a) God will make a house for David’s son if David makes a house for
God-establishment of a homeland
b) Conditional aspect to it based on obedience to
commandments/allegiance to covenants
C. God’s covenant with Solomon
1. David’s son built the first temple in Jerusalem
2. Following Solomon’s death, the kingdom was split into two:
a) Israel in north
b) Judah in south
D. Micah
1. Israel ended up falling to the Assyrians two centuries later as foretold by
prophet Micah
2. Micah admonished Israelites for disobeying God’s covenants
E. Destruction of Solomon’s temple/Babylonian Exile
1. Judah fell to the Babylonians and the temple in Jerusalem was destroyed
2. Israelites exiled to Babylonia (modern day Iraq), initiates Diaspora
a) Diaspora: the dispersion of Jews outside of Israel
(1) Today it means Jews outside of the modern state of Israel
3. Babylonian exile known as period in which monotheism becomes more
universalized
a) It moves beyond thinking that the Hebrew god is not only better
than other gods, but is the only god
4. 50 years later, Cyrus of Persia allowed all captives to return to their
homelands- some returned to Judah but many had assimilated to life in
Babylon and did not go back
a) Centuries later Babylonian Talmud was produced by the Jewish
community in Babylon
F. Jewish Identity away from Jerusalem
1. Prophet Jeremiah calls Jewish people to repent and obey God’s
commandments in wake of defeat by Assyrians and Babylonians
III. The Second Temple Period: post-Exile
A. Israelites who returned to homeland were restricted to the area immediately
around Jerusalem
B. They rebuilt the Temple in Jerusalem
C. Post-exilic identity: Ezra 8-10
1. Associated with return to Jerusalem:
a) Renewed focus on Torah
b) denunciation of mixed marriages between Israelites and basically
all non-Israelites
(1) Ezra demanded that foreign wives be exiled
c) re-emergence of centrality of Temple life and rituals
2. Jews, Conversion, and “missionary” efforts
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version