Final Presentation Notes

8 Pages
54 Views
Unlock Document

Department
History
Course
HISTORY 592G
Professor
Robert Paynter
Semester
Spring

Description
SIT­IN MOVEMENT/FREEDOM RIDES/ALBANY MOVEMENT SIT­IN MOVEMENT BEGINS: NORTH CAROLINA A&T  On January 31, 1960   Joseph McNeill was not served at a segregated bus terminal in Greensboro, North  Carolina.   That night in his dormitory at North Carolina Agricultural & Technical College,  McNeill, Ezell Blair Jr., Franklin McCain and David Richmond began to discuss  their anger at Jim Crow laws   On February 1, 1960  The next day about 30 students joined the desegregation protest   On February 3, 1960, over 50 black students and 3 white students participated in the  demonstration.   Within a week, sit­ins were being staged or planned in High Point, Charlotte,  Winston­Salem, Elizabeth City, Concord and other North Carolina cities and  towns   Importance: A STUDENT LED REVOLT  initiated the student phase of the black struggle (Sitkoff, 64).  SIT­IN MOVEMENT EXPANDS: NASHVILLE, TALLAHASSEE, MONTGOMERY  By April 1960   the tactic had spread to 78 Southern and border communities;   some two thousand students had been arrested.   Tallahassee  a small CORE group at Florida Agricultural & Mechanical College  staged a sit­in at Woolworths   along with15 white supporters from Florida State University joined them   Nashville  In February 1960  a contingent of blacks from Fisk University and the American Baptist Theological  Seminary, aided by some whites from Vanderbilt University,   Montgomery  35 Alabama State College students demonstrated for service at the Montgomery  County courthouse snack shop on February 25, 1960   Governor John Patterson ordered the president of the college, H.C. Trenholm to  expel any student involved in a sit­in  SIT IN MOVEMENT AND ELECTION OF 1960: ATLANTA, GA  By April 1960   the tactic had spread to 78 Southern and border communities;   some two thousand students had been arrested.   Tallahassee  a small CORE group at Florida Agricultural & Mechanical College  staged a sit­in at Woolworths   along with15 white supporters from Florida State University joined them   Nashville  In February 1960  a contingent of blacks from Fisk University and the American Baptist Theological  Seminary, aided by some whites from Vanderbilt University,   Montgomery  35 Alabama State College students demonstrated for service at the Montgomery  County courthouse snack shop on February 25, 1960   Governor John Patterson ordered the president of the college, H.C. Trenholm to  expel any student involved in a sit­in  STUDENT NONVIOLENT COORDINATING COMMITTEE  Ella Baker   persuaded the SCLC to appropriate $800   the president of her alma matter, Shaw University in Raleigh, to make it facilities  available for an Easter­weekend conference of youth leaders  April 16­18, 1960 in Raleigh, North Carolina   “nonviolence as a political weapon”   Temporary Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee   In October 1960, a plenary conference meeting in the Atlanta University Center  dropped Temporary from its name and made the Student Nonviolent  Coordinating Committee   Charles McDew, chairperson FREEDOM RIDES AND C.O.R.E  Congress of Racial Equality  Founded by James L. Farmer, Jr. George Houser, James R. Robinson, and Bernice  Fisher in Chicago in 1941.   The group had evolved out of the pacifist Fellowship of Reconciliation, and  sought to apply the principles of nonviolence as a tactic against segregation.   First Attempt at Freedom Ride: 1947 Journey of Reconciliation   The two­week journey by 16 (8 white, 8 black) men began on April 9, 1947.   Supported by the 1946 U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Morgan v.  Virginia  Most Americans never heard of it. With few arrests and little violence, the  Journey of Reconciliation received scant attention in the press. No one even  fancied the possibility of coverage by television, then in its infancy.  FREEDOM RIDES: ANNISTON, AL  May 14, 1961   First Bus of Freedom Riders arrived in Anniston, Alabama, and angry mob of Ku  Klux Klansmen surrounded the bus.  The riders were viciously beaten as they fled the burning bus, and only warning  shots fired into the air by highway patrolmen prevented the riders from  being lynched.  The Second Bus of Freedom Riders arrived it was boarded by eight Klansmen,  who proceeded to beat the Freedom Riders and afterwards left them semi­ conscious in the back of the bus.    f FREEDOM RIDES: BIRMINGHAM, AL  Diane Nash of SNCC  “The students have decided that we can’t let violence overcome.”   SNCC would continue what CORE began, “The ride must not be stopped. If they  stop us with violence, the movement is dead.”   Nash recruited a handful of sit­in veterans in Nashville for the trip to  Birmingham. A new phase of the Freedom Ride began   On the outskirts of Birmingham, police met the bus carrying the SNCC volunteers and  escorted it to the terminal  eight black and two white Freedom Riders were arrested and put in “protective  custody.”  One driver remarked, “I have only one life to give and I’m not going to give it to the  NAACP or CORE!”   Finally, on May 20, the Freedom Ride resumed, with the bus carrying the riders traveling  toward Montgomery at 90 miles an hour protected by a contingent of Alabama State  Troopers.  FREEDOM RIDES: MONTGOMERY, AL  SNCC and CORE contingent reached the Montgomery city limits, the Highway Patrol  abandoned them.  At the bus station on South Court Street, a white mob awaited and beat the  Freedom Riders with baseball bats and iron pipes.   Again, white Freedom Riders were singled out for particularly brutal beatings.   Reporters and news photographers were attacked first and their cameras  destroyed, but there is a famous picture taken later of Zwerg in the hospital,  beaten and bruised. (picture on the left)  The Kennedy Administration belatedly decided that the time had come when it must act.   the Freedom Rides would continue as a movement, Dr. King announced a mass rally for  May 21, sponsored by the Montgomery Improvement Association.   More than fifteen hundred people crowded into Ralph Abernathy’s First Baptist Church.  Outside, a mob of more than 3,000 whites attacked black people, with a handful of  United States Marshalls protected the church from assault and firebombs   WHAT’S NEXT? SNCC AND THE VOTER EDUCATION PROJECT  Southern Regional Council urging a voter registration campaign in the South   Voter registration drives have been the hallmark of the African American  community   The Voter Education Project (VEP) grew out of the convergence of politics and principle.   In the wake of the freedom rides, the Kennedy administration believed that “it  would be valuable if some of the present energy were channeled into this vital  [registration] work”   the Justice Department informally communicated to the SRC its interest in  helping the civil­rights movement attack black disfranchisement   In July 1961, Robert Moses, a SNCC staff members then in his mid­twenties, journeyed  to McComb, Mississippi  THE ALBANY MOVEMENT  The Albany Movement would prove to be a further example of small gains and yet large  loses in the Civil Rights Movement.  November 1961: SNCC’s Charles Sherrod & Cordell Reagon to register African­ American voters in southwestern Georgia.   It quickly became a broad­front nonviolent attack on every aspect of segregation within  the city.    The chief of police Laurie Pritchett would stop white violence against the demonstrators,  but would fill the jails with black demonstrators.  “BOMBINGHAM”/FREEDOM SUMMER/MARCH ON WASHINGTON BIRMINGHAM AND 1963: VOTING AND RACIAL UNREST  “America’s Johannesburg,” Birmingham, Alabama  “Bombingham”  18 racial bombings and more than 50 cross­burning incidents that occurred  between 1957­1963  Eugene T. “Bull” Connor   “We’re not going to have white folks and nigras segregatin’ together in this man’s  town”   Reverend Fred Lee Shuttlesworth  fearless head of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights, an SCLC  affiliate that attempted to desegregate schools, buses, and government offices in  Birmingham.  BIRMGINHAM: PROJECT C, STAGES 1 AND 2  “Project C” = Confrontation  Stage 1: Sit­Ins  sit­ins at the segregated downtown lunch counters and to press for hiring 
More Less

Related notes for HISTORY 592G

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit