Textbook Notes (368,678)
Canada (162,066)
Biology (111)
BIOL 2600 (2)
Chapter

Ecology 2006.docx

26 Pages
173 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology
Course
BIOL 2600
Professor
Nigel Waltho
Semester
Fall

Description
 Ecology 2006 Prof: Dr. Nigel Waltho Mon. & Wed.   10:05am 100853922 Lecture 1  Introduction: Organismal Biology: • Evolutionary Biology – how individuals have evolved and adapted to their environment  through interactions with other individuals, populations and other species. • Behavioural Ecology – how an individuals behaviours contribute to their survival and  reproductive success and in turn the abundance in that population. • Physiological ecology – The study of how organisms are physiologically adapted to their  environment and how this limits their distribution patterns. • Population ecology ­ the study of groups of interbreeding individuals at the same place  at the same time. Lecture 2 Freshwater Biomes: Chapter 24 Water: Is the most dense at 4’C and its least dense as ice. (increases density with salinity) Layers of Water:  (water – chapter 6) In temperate lakes, in the summer, three layers are present (Figure 24.2c). An upper layer, called  the epilimnion, is warmed by the sun and mixed well by the wind. Below this lies a transition  zone known as the thermocline, where the temperature declines rapidly. Lower still is the  hypolimnion, a cool layer too far below the surface to be much warmed and with low light  levels. Two types of food webs (sun driven) 1   = bentic­based macrophytic 2  = pelagic­based microphytic Cultural Eutrophication: (only takes a couple of years) Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD) Dissolved oxygen (DO):  the amount of oxygen that occurs in microscopic bubbles of gas mixed  in with the water and that supports aquatic life. Oxygen enters the water directly via diffusion  from the atmosphere, from aquatic plants or algae that release it via photosynthesis, or via  waterfalls and water tumbling over rocks, which traps air. DO  = the same at all levels of the water. •  Lotic  (fast moving water) has a higher DO than  lentic    (slow moving water).  • Also Temperature has an effect, cold water can hold more DO.  Air ­ amount of oxygen 200,000ppm (20%) cold water ­ 10ppm (less in warm) (a common water quality test, is testing the BOD higher bod ­ greater likelihood DO(dissolved oxygen) depleted i.e. how much organic nutrients in the water higher the bod measure, the more oxygen is required to decompose the material once all is depleted you are left with an anoxic anoxic = environment depleted of oxygen ( can be the result of high organic matter being broken  down by bacteri –which use O­ e.g. near sewage leakage systems) ­fish and shellfish are killed when the DO drops below 2 or 3 ppm if systems go anaerobic (lack of oxygen) the only thing able to survive in water is bacteria (which adopts a fermentation or anaerobic respiration) anerobic respiration releases methane (smelly!) raw sewage BOD = 250ppm ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ Dissolved Oxygen: Is equal at all levels of the lake. DO=10ppm add nutrients (our sewage, agricultural run off, sediments etc.) when you add nutrients, phytoplankton, algae will EXPLODE in population algae floats on top because of photosynthesis advantage, however this provides shade for other  plants and kills them off NOW, DO 1 = interspecific >intraspecific cc if<1 = interspecific  food webs, photosynthesis(1­2%) ­­­­­­>Biomass ­­­­>  (bottom up resource availability model) How much algae that is available controls how many organisms can eat, which determines how  many bigger animals will be available etc. etc.  ­implies unlimited fishing opportunity however, fails to explain when high fishing pressure, fish communities collapse, and lakes  EXPLODE with algae! (DUE TO OVERFISHING, MESSES IT UP!) fishing pressure goes up = removes top predators,  (see lecture slides for formula) collapse of benthic food web ­algae don't live long, but reproduce quickly,  ­when they die they decompose and suck all the oxygen out of the water,  and then everything dies except algae :( • obviously were missing something….that is, the bottom up resource availability model is  not complete. • Brown World with little to no fishing pressure: top down predator prey model Green or Brown: demonstrate for benthis substrate Rideau River assume major grazer is the larval caddisfly. AQUATIC SYSTEMS ARE BROWN ­ in their natural state TERESTRIAL SYSTEMS ARE GREEN ­ in their natural state Nitrogen Limitation Hypothesis: Two variations: first the plant stress initiation: that when plants are under stresses such as  drought they are more nitrogen heavy and therefore are more appealing to plants. Second: Plant Vigor Hypothesis: herbivores choose young plants/newly grown parts of plants  because they will be more enriched with fresh nitrogen! Lecture 9: Chapter 25 – Food Webs & Energy Flow Food Chain:  ­ Autotrophs: harvest sunlight or other chemical energy, and begin at the bottom of the food  chain, providing energy for other animals (primary producers). Insectd and other small animals  that consume primary producers are known as primary consumers.  ­ Organisms that eat primary consumers are secondary consumers, also called carnivores  ­ Organisms that feed on secondary consumers are tertiary consumers, also called secondary  carnivores, and so on. Types of Food Webs: In connectedness webs, all the known links are drawn and equal importance is attached to each  link (Figure 25.4a). Paine provided the first example of an energy web, where interaction  strengths—based on quantities of food consumed and indicated by the thickness of connecting  links—were calculated. Detritus: dead plant and animal material and waste that decomposes and begins life again.  Organisms that assist in the decomposing of such material are called detritivores. (mainly  bacteria and fungi). Efficiency on Food Webs: (Equations): • Consumption efficiency is the proportion of production at one trophic level (Prodn − 1)  that is eaten by, or ingested, by the next trophic level (In) • Assimilation efficiency is the proportion of ingested energy that is assimilated into the  bloodstream • Production efficiency is defined as the percentage of energy assimilated by an organism  that becomes incorporated into new biomass. It is influenced largely by animal  metabolism: Complexity of Food Webs: Linkage density: number of links/ number of species = 40/20 = 2.0 Chain Length: number of different organisms in chain (i.e. lion eats zebra, zebra eats grass, =3  links) Connectedness: number of links/ Number of total possible links  (number of species/  number of links Not All Species In a Food Web Are Equally Important ­ they are divided into: keystone species: A species having a huge effect on a community, out of all proportion to its biomass. (e.g. sea  o
More Less

Related notes for BIOL 2600

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit