Textbook Notes (368,432)
Canada (161,877)
Psychology (773)
PSYC 101 (70)
Chapter 4

psych chapter 4.docx

8 Pages
80 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 101
Professor
Catherine Rawn
Semester
Winter

Description
psych chapter 4 & 5 test 11/08/2013 Illusion­ perception in which the way we perceive a stimulus doesn’t match its physical reality Sensation­ detection of physical energy by the sense organs, which then send information to the brain Perception­ brain’s interpretation of raw sensory input Transduction­ conversion of external energy into electrical activity within neurons Sense receptor­ specialized cells responsible for transduction for specific sensory systems Sensory adaptation­ activation is greatest when stimulus is first detected Psychophysics­ study of how we perceive sensory stimuli based on their physical characteristics Absolute threshold­ lowest level of stimulation needed to detect a stimulus 50 percent of the time Just noticeable difference­ smallest change in the intensity of a stimulus that we can detect Weber’s law­ law that there is a constant proportional relationship between the JND and original intensity of  stimulus Signal detection theory­ theory regarding how stimuli are detected under different conditions Synesthesia­ condition in which people experience cross­modal sensations Parallel processing­ ability to attend to many sense modalities simultaneously Bottom­up processing­ processing in which a whole is constructed from parts  Top­down processing­ conceptually driven processing that is influenced by beliefs and expectancies Perceptual set­ set formed when experiences influence perceptions Perceptual constancy­ process by which we perceive stimuli consistently across varied conditions Selective attention­ process of selecting one sensory channel and ignoring or minimizing others Inattentional blindness­ failure to detect stimuli in plain view when attention focused elsewhere Subliminal perception­  Schlera­ white part of eye Pupil­ opening of eye through which light enters Cornea­ curved, transparent dome that bends incoming light Lens­ transparent disk that bends light rays for near or far vision  Accommodation­ changing the shape of the lens to focus on near or far objects Retina­ membrane at back of eye responsible for converting light into neural activity  Fovea­ central portion of retina Acuity­ sharpness of vision Rods­ receptor cells in retina that allow us to see in low level of light Dark adaptation­ time in dark before rods regain maximum light sensitivity Cones­ receptor cells that allow us to detect colour Optic nerve­ nerve that travels from retina to brain Blind spot­ area in retina where there are no receptor cells Feature detector cell­ specialized cells that detect lines and edges Phi phenomenon­ illusory perception of movement created by successive flashing of images Trichromatic theory­ theory that colour vision is based on three primary colours­ red, green, blue Opponent process theory­ theory that we perceive colours in terms of three pairs of opponent colours­ red­ green, blue­yellow, black­white  Depth perception­ ability to judge distance and three dimensional relations Monocular depth cues­ stimuli that enables us to judge depth using one eye Binocular depth cues­ stimuli that allows us to judge depth using both eyes Blindness­ presence of vision of equal to or less than 20/200 on Snellen eye chart Visual agnosia­ condition in which person can describe colour, shape, etc. of object but can’t name or  recognize it Blindsight­ phenomenon in which blind ppl who’ve experienced damage to specific part of cortex can still  make correct guesses about visual stimuli presented to them Audition­ our sense of hearing Pitch­ corresponds to frequency of wave Loudness­ corresponds to amplitude (height) of wave Timbre­ quality or complexity of a sound Cochlea­ bony, spiral­shaped sense organ that converts vibration into neural activity Organ of corti­ tissue containing hair cells necessary for hearing Basilar membrane­ membrane supporting the organ of corti and hair cells in the cochlea Place theory­ theory that a specific place on basilar membrane matches a tone with a specific pitch  Frequency theory­ theory that the rate of neurons firing action potentials faithfully reproduces the pitch Conductive deafness­ deafness resulting from malfunctioning of ear, especially eardrum and or ossicles of  inner ear Nerve deafness­ deafness resulting from 
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit