Textbook Notes (368,795)
Canada (162,165)
York University (12,867)
Psychology (3,584)
PSYC 1010 (1,086)
Chapter 16

Chapter 16 psychology: final exam

6 Pages
106 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 1010
Professor
Gerry Goldberg
Semester
Winter

Description
Psychology­ Chapter 16: Social Behaviour Social psychology: is the branch of psychology concerned with the way individuals’  thoughts, feelings, and behaviour is influenced.  Person Perception: Forming impressions of others ­ Person perception: the process of forming impressions of others.   ­ The more attractive the person, the tendencies one has to attribute them with  desirable and positive personality traits.   ­ Schemas: are cognitive structures that guide information processing.  ­ Social schemas: are organized clusters of ideas about categories of social events  and people.   Stereotypes: ­ These are widely held beliefs that people have certain characteristics because of  their membership in a particular group.   ­ Most common stereotypes are based on age, sex, and ethnic or occupational  groups ­ Gender stereotypes: tend to assume that women or less dominant than men.  ­ Age stereotypes: suggest that elderly people are slow, forgetful and asexual.   ­ Occupational stereotypes: suggest that lawyers are manipulative, and artists are  moody.  ­ Illusory correlation: occurs when people estimate that they have encountered  more confirmations of an association between social traits than they have actually  seen.   ­ Ingroup: a group that one belongs to and identified with ­ Outgroup: a group that one does not belong to or identify with  ­ People use social schemas to categorize others Attribution Processes: Explaining Behaviour  ­ Attributions: are inferences that people draw about the causes of events, others’  behaviour, and their own behaviour.   Internal vs. External Attributions:  ­ Fritz Heider was first to describe how people make attributions.   ­ Internal attributions: ascribe the causes of behaviour to personal dispositions,  traits, abilities, and feelings.   ­ External attributions: ascribe the causes of behaviour to situational demands and  environmental constraints.  (Example: A kid who smashed their parents car,  internal attributions are he was careless, external attribute is the roads are  slippery.) Actor­Observer bias:  ­ Fundamental attribution error: which refers to observers’ bias in favour of internal  attributions in explaining others’ behaviour.   Defensive Attribution: ­ Defensive attribution is a tendency to blame victims for their misfortune, so that  one feels less likely to be victimized in a similar way.  ­ The belief in a just world: evidence telling us that the world is not a just place is  threatening and that we feel compelled to restore the belief that it is a just world.   Culture and Attributional Tendencies:  ­ Individualism: involves putting personal goals ahead of group goals and defining  one’s identity in terms of personal attributes rather than group memberships.   ­ Collectivism: involves putting group goals ahead of personal goals and defining  one’s identity in terms of the groups one belongs to.   ­ Collectivist cultures place a higher priority on shared values and resources,  cooperation, mutual interdependence.   ­ Canada ranks 4  in individualism, behind the United States, Australia, and Great  Britain.  ­ Self­serving bias: is the tendency to attribute one’s success to personal factors and  one’s failures to situational factors.   Close Relationships: Liking and Loving ­ Interpersonal attraction: refers to the positive feelings toward another Physical attractiveness: ­ Key determinant of romantic attraction for both sexes ­ Matching hypothesis: proposes that males and females approximately equal  physical attractiveness are likely to select each other as partners.   Passionate and Companionate Love: ­ Two kinds of love: 1. Passionate love: is a complete absorption in another that includes tender sexual  feelings and the agony and ecstasy of intense emotion.   2. Companionate love: is warm, trusting, tolerant affection for another whose life is  deeply intertwined with one’s own.   ­ Robert Sternberg suggests companionate love subdivides into intimacy and  commitment.   ­ Intimacy: refers to warmth, closeness, and sharing in a relationship. ­ Commitment: is intent to maintain a relationship in spite of the difficulties and  costs that may arise.   Love as Attachment:  ­ Romantic love is an attachment process ­ People with an anxious­ambivalent attachment: the infancy will tend to have  romantic relationships marked by anxiety and ambivalence in adulthood.   ­ Three forms of adults’ love relationships: 1. Secure adults: find it relatively easy to get close with others, love relationships are  trusting.  2. Anxious­ambivalent adults:  love accompanied by expectations of rejection and  described their love relationships as volatile and marked by jealousy.   3. Avoidant adults: found it difficult to get close to others and described their love  relationships as lacking intimacy and trust.   ­ Attachment anxiety: reflects how much people worry that their partners will not  be available when needed.   ­ Attachment avoidance: reflects the degree to which people feel uncomfortable  with closeness and intimacy and therefore tend to maintain emotional distance  from their partners.   ­ Males place an emphasis on physical attractiveness and females putting a higher  priority on social status and financial resources.   Attitudes: Making Social Judgments ­ Attitudes: are positive or negative evaluations of objects of thought (objects of  thought may include: social issues, groups (liberals, farmers), institutions, and  people. Components and Dimensions of Attitudes:  ­ Attitudes as being made up of three components: 1. Cognitive component: is made up of the beliefs that people hold about the object  of an attitude 2. Affective component: of an att
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 1010

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit