Textbook Notes (368,321)
114 (1)
114 .241 (1)
Chapter 1

Lecturenotes-chapter1.pdf

7 Pages
92 Views
Unlock Document

Department
114
Course
114 .241
Professor
Arno Leist
Semester
Winter

Description
    LECTURER NOTES    Chapter 1  The Nature of Contemporary Human Resource Management      CHAPTER OVERVIEW    This chapter introduces students to the theories and practices of human resource  management. HRM is defined and the central tenets of the various HRM models are  explained. The central importance of the nature of the employment relationship to HRM  is explained, and the chapter draws attention to four aspects: economic, legal, social  and psychological. Emphasis is given to understanding competing normative HRM  models rather than to practical HRM activities.     Chapter objectives    After studying this chapter, students should be able to:    ♦ Explain the development of human resource management  ♦ Define HRM and its relation to organizational management  ♦ Explain the central features of the contract in the employment relationship  ♦ Summarize the key HRM functions   ♦ Explain the theoretical issues surrounding the HRM debate  ♦ Appreciate the different approaches to studying HRM.      LECTURE OUTLINE    Introduction    The shift from orthodox personnel management to HRM is explained in terms of global  economic developments.     HRM debate has exposed traditional underlying tensions and paradoxes in managing the  employment relationship.   1 Development of human resource management     The development of personnel management is linked to post‐Second World War  government economic policies (Keynesianism), new employment law, and  recommendations of the Donovon Commission.     The HRM phenomenon is explained in terms of the renaissance of ‘market disciplines’,  neoliberalism and the challenge to government intervention in the economy.      Management and human resource management    After defining HRM, the terms ‘human resources’ and ‘management’ are explained.    a) People determine organizational outcomes. Employees are problematic because:  people have dual natures; people form groups; people have freedom of choice.  Managers therefore have to deal with a range of issues, tensions and contradictions  arising at individual, group, and organizational levels.     b) Management as science, art, politics and control.     HRM IN PRACTICE 1.1: A new role for HR professionals.     Base a seminar discussion around the questions at the end of this feature and use it to  illustrate the new skills required from HR managers and the new responsibilities they  are taking on as the ‘moral compass’ for organizations.      LECTURE ENHANCEMENT    To help students understand where HRM fits into the ‘big’ picture of managing the  organization, reference may be made to the traditional four management functions of  planning, organizing, leading, and controlling.     Ask students what HRM activities are associated with each management function.  Example: HR Planning (planning); Recruitment and selection (organizing); Job design  (leading); and appraisal (controlling). Questions may also be asked about how the HR  function has changed over the last 10 years.       The nature of the employment relationship    Four main components of the employment relationship are discussed: economic, legal,  social and psychological.  2 The extended discussion on the psychological contract reflects recent interest in this  topic in the HRM discourse.      LECTURE ENHANCEMENT    To provide further insight into the nature of the psychological contract, see Elizabeth  Morrison and Sandra Robinson’s chapter ‘Examining constructs to capturing the  exchange nature of the employment relationship,’ in Jacqueline A‐M. Coyle‐Shapiro et al  (eds.), The Employment Relationship (2005, pp. 161‐80). The authors extend  psychological contract research by examining the nature of incongruent perceptions  between the two parties to the exchange. They argue that incongruence in perceptions  stems from the nature of the mutual obligations that exist and the cognitive processes  that affect how workers and managers interpret each other’s contributions to the  relationship.     TEACHING TIP    Direct students to the reflective question (p.13) to engage them in a discussion on the  concept of the psychological contract.    Human resource management functions    To explore HRM functions the text addresses three questions: What do HR professionals  do? What affects what they do? And how do HR professionals do what they do? We  identify nine key HRM functions to answer the first question, including planning,  integrating, staffing, developing, motivating, designing, managing relationships,  managing change, and evaluating.     We also identify three broad contingencies: external context, strategy and  organizational design to address the question ‘What affects what HR professionals do?  And a range of technical, cognitive and interpersonal processes and skills are used to  accomplish HR functions.     HRM IN PRACTICE 1.2: Twenty‐first‐century HR senior HR leaders have a changing role.      This  feature  can  be  used  st  generate  discussion  about  the  challenges  of  senior  HR  managers in the early 21  century, including how HR can be defined, how its outcomes  can be evaluated, and how it differs (if at all) from personnel management.      Organizing the HR function    3 The way the HR function is organized and its relative power depends upon external  factors (e.g. government legislation) and internal factors (e.g., business strategy and  organizational culture).     The three related dimensions of HRM – functions, contingencies and skills – are shown  diagrammatically in a three‐dimensional framework.       LECTURE ENHANCEMENT    The 2004 Workplace Employment Relations Survey provides empirical data on HR  practices, which can be used to draw attention to the HR function and the ‘rhetoric  versus r
More Less

Related notes for 114 .241

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit