Mircea Eliade worksheet.docx

6 Pages
137 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Religious Studies
Course
RELSTDS 4972
Professor
Sarah Iles Johnston
Semester
Spring

Description
Mircea Eliade: (1907­1986) I. Background A. Mentors/training/intellectual tradition  Romanian­born historian of religions, humanist, orientalist, philosopher, and  creative writer. [ER 2573]  Editor in chief of the first edition of the Encyclopedia of Religions  Born in Bucharest, the son of an army officer, Eliade witnessed the German  occupation of his homeland when he was only nine years old. [ER 2573]  His notable interests began when he was still at the lycée. [ER 2573]  An early article entitled “The Enemy of the Silkworm” reflects the boy’s intense  interest in plants, animals, and insects. [ER 2573]  Eliade had already published his one hundredth article by the time he entered the  University of Bucharest in 1925. [ER 2573]  At the university, he became a devoted disciple of the philosopher Nae Ionescu,  who taught him the importance of life experience, commitment, intuition, and the  spiritual or psychological reality of mental worlds. [ER 2573]  Eliade was blessed with the happy combination of an unusually keen mind, strong  intuition, a fertile imagination, and the determination to work hard. Much of the  structure of his later thought, and some of the paradoxes of his life, were  foreshadowed during his student years. [ER 2573]  Strong sense of “destiny” within his journals.  As though to fulfill Eliade’s preordained destiny, the maharaja of Kassimbazar  offered him a grant to study Indian philosophy with Surendranath Dasgupta at the  University of Calcutta (1928–1932). [ER 2573]  He also spent six months in the ashram of Rishikesh in the Himalayas. [ER 2573]  In 1938 he founded the journal Zalmoxis: Revue des études religieuses.  (Unfortunately, circulation ceased after 1942.) [ER 2574]  Eliade was also active in the so­called Criterion group, consisting of male and  female intellectuals. [ER 2574] B. Principal geographical and historical concerns  Eliade’s plea was that his compatriots should exploit this period of “creative  freedom” from tradition and should try to learn from other parts of the world what  possibilities for life and thought there were. (Post­WWI; Pre­WWII) [ER 2573]  (Early­Eliade) To him, India was more than a place for scholarly research. He felt  that a mystery was hidden somewhere in India, and deciphering it would disclose  the mystery of his own existence. India indeed revealed to him the profound  meaning of the freedom that can be achieved by abolishing the routine conditions  of human existence, a meaning indicated in the subtitle of his book on Yoga:  Immortality and Freedom. [ER 2573]  (Early­Eliade) The stay in India also opened his eyes to the existence of common  elements in all peasant cultures—for example, in China, Southeast Asia, pre­ Aryan aboriginal India, the Mediterranean world, and the Iberian Peninsula—the  elements from which he would later derive the notion of “cosmic religion.” [ER  2573]  “We, the people of Eastern Europe, would be able to serve as a bridge between the  West and Asia.” As he remarked in his autobiography, “A good part of my activity  in [Romania] between 1932 and 1940 found its point of departure in these  intuitions and observations” (Autobiography: Journey East, Journey West, vol. 1,  1981, p. 204). [ER 2573]  (Early­Eliade) Pre­Aryan aboriginal Indian spirituality (which has remained an  important thread in the fabric of Hinduism to the present) led Eliade to speculate  on a comparable synthesis in southeastern Europe and Romanian culture, based  also on the reconstructions of Dacian culture by Romanian philosopher­folklorist,  B. P. Hasdeu. [ER 2573­4] C. Principal thematic concerns  His ultimate concern was the revitalization of all branches of learning and the arts,  and his great hope was to decipher the message of the cosmos, which to him was  a great repository of hidden meanings. [ER 2573]  “Perhaps, without knowing it, I was in search of a new, wider humanism, bolder  than the humanism of the Renaissance, which was too dependent on the models of  Mediterranean classicism . . . . Ultimately, I dr
More Less

Related notes for RELSTDS 4972

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit