Textbook Notes (367,787)
United States (205,879)
Psychology (61)
PSY-0001 (33)
Chapter 10

chap 10 reading.docx

7 Pages
103 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY-0001
Professor
Sam Sommers
Semester
Fall

Description
04/15/2014 10.1 Learning Objectives Distinguish between primary and secondary emotions Compare and contrast the James­Lange, Cannon­Bard, and Schachter­Singer two­factor theories of  emotion Discuss the roles that the amygdala and prefrontal cortex play in emotional experience Define misattribution of arousal and excitation transfer Discuss common strategies that people use to regulate their emotional states How Do We Experience Emotions? Subjective component Primary emotions Evolutionarily adaptive and universal across cultures  Include anger, fear, sadness, disgust, happiness, surprise, contempt Secondary emotions are blends of primary ones May be described using two dimensions: valence and activation Negative affect and positive affect are independent  Physiological component James­Lange theory of emotion maintains that we perceive patterns of bodily responses and experience  emotion as result of our perceptions Cannon­Bard theory of emotion maintains that the mind and body experience emotion independently  Emotions are associated with changes in bodily states Amygdala and prefrontal cortex have important roles in the production and experience of emotion  Cognitive component  Schachter=Singer two­factor theory of emotion maintains that emotions involve a physiological component  and a cognitive component or interpretation The interpretation determines the emotion we feel Misattribution of arousal occurs when people misidentify the source of their arousal Excitation transfer occurs when residual arousal caused by one event is transferred to a new stimulus We regulate our emotional states  Humor and distraction are effective strategies for regulating negative affect Rumination and thought suppression are not effective strategies  Terms Emotions: feelings that involve subjective evaluation, physiological processes, and cognitive beliefs Primary emotions: emotions that are evolutionarily adaptive, shared across cultures, and associated  with specific physical states; they include anger, fear, sadness, disgust, happiness, and possibly surprise  and contempt Secondary emotions: blends of primary emotions; they include remorse, guilt, submission, and  anticipation Arousal: physiological activation (such as increased brain activity) or increased autonomic responses  (such as increased heart rate, sweating, or muscle tension) 10.2 Learning Objectives Review research on the cross­cultural universality of emotional expressions Define display rules Discuss the impact of emotions on decision and self­regulation Discuss the interpersonal functions of guilt and embarrassment  How Are Emotions Adaptive? Facial expressions communicate emotion Facial expressions of emotion are adaptive because they communicate how we feel Across cultures, there are some expressions of emotion that are universally recognized, including  happiness, sadness, anger, and pride Display rules differ across cultures and between the sexes Display rules are learned thorugh socialization and dictate how and when people expres emotions Females express emotions more readily, frequently, easily , and intensely than males  Emotions serve cognitive functions  We use our emotions as a guide when making decisions Emotions often serve as heuristic guides, enabling quick decision­making Somaticmarker theory maintains that we used our bodily reactions to emotional events to regulate our  behaviors (use interpretation of body’s responses to make decisions) Emotions strengthen interpersonal relations Emotions facilitate the maintenance and repair of social bonds Guilt discourages people from engaging in actions that may ham their relationships and encourages people  to engage in actions that will strengthen them Embarrassment rectifies interpersonal awkwardness and restores social bonds after a social error or  wrongdoing has been committed Terms Display rules: rules learned through socialization that dictate which emotions are suitable to given  situations Somatic markers: bodily reactions that arise from the emotional evaluation of an action’s  consequences 10.3 Learning Objectives Distinguish between a motive, a need and a drive Describe Maslow’s hierarchy of needs Describe the Yerkes­Dodson law Distinguish between extrinsic motivation and intrinsic motivation Discuss the relationships between self­efficacy, the achievement motive, delayed gratification, and goal  achievement  How Does Motivation Energize, Direct, and Sustain Behavior? Multiple factors motivate behavior Motives activate, direct, and sustain behaviors that will satisfy a need Needs create arousal ▯ creates response to satisfy the need Maslow’s hierarchy proposes five needs: physiological, safety, belonging and love, esteem, and self­ actualization needs Homeostasis  refers to the body’s attempts to maintain a state of equilibrium  Yerkes­Dodson law states that a person performs best when his or her level of arousal is neither too low nor  too high  Some behaviors are motivated for their own sake Extrinsically motivated behaviors – directed toward the achievement of an external goal Intrinsically motived behaviors – fulfill no obvious purpose, performed because they are pleasurable Extrinsic rewards decrease intrinsic motivation because they decrease our  experience of autonomy and competence of because the reward replaces the goal  of pleasure  We set goals
More Less

Related notes for PSY-0001

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit