Textbook Notes (368,501)
United States (206,054)
Psychology (61)
PSY-0001 (33)
Chapter 9

chap 9 reading.docx

6 Pages
23 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY-0001
Professor
Sam Sommers
Semester
Fall

Description
04/15/2014 9.1  Learning Objectives Describe how the prenatal environment can affect development Explain how dynamic systems theory illuminates the ways biology and environment work together to shape  development  Describe key processes in infant brain development and how these processes affect learning Describe the types of attachment infants have o their caregivers Explain how attachment and emotion regulation are related What Shapes Us During Childhood? Development starts in the womb Many factors in the prenatal environment, such as nutrition and hormones, can affect development Exposure to teratogens (e.g., drugs, alcohol, viruses) can result in death, deformity, or mental disorders Biology and environment influence developmental milestones Infants have many sensory abilities For example, they can discriminate smells, tastes, and sounds  Infant physical development follows a consistent pattern across cultures, but cultural practices can affect  the timing of milestones, such as walking Dynamic systems theory helps us see how every new development occurs due to complex interactions  between biology, environment, and personal agency Brain development promotes learning Involves both maturation and experience Brain’s plasticity allows changes in the development of connections and in the synaptic pruning of unused  neural connections Timing of experiences necessary for brain development is particularly important in the early years  Children develop attachment and emotion regulation Emotional bond that develops between a child and a caregiver increases the child’s chances of survival Attachment styles are generally categorized as secure or insecure Insecure attachment can be avoidant or ambivalent Secure attachments are related to better adjustment later in life, including good emotion regulation skills  and social relationships  Terms Developmental psychology: the study of changes, over the life span, in physiology, cognition,  emotion, and social behavior Teratogens: environmental agents that harm the embryo or fetus Dynamic systems theory: the view that development is a self­organizing process, where new forms  of behavior emerge through consistent interactions between a biological being and his other cultural and  environmental contexts Synaptic pruning: a process whereby the synaptic connections in the brain that are used are  preserved, and those that are not used are lost Sensitive periods: time periods when specific skills develop most easily Attachment: a strong emotional connection that persists over time and across circumstances Secure attachment: the attachment style for a majority of infants; the infant is confident enough to  play in an unfamiliar environment as long as the caregiver is present and is readily comforted by the  caregiver during times of distress Insecure attachment: the attachment style for a minority of infants; the infant may exhibit insecure  attachment through various behaviors, such as avoiding contact with the caregiver, or by alternating  between approach and avoidance behaviors 9.2 Learning Objectives Provide examples of techniques psychologists use to find out what infants know and can do Explain how memory changes over time as children grow and learn  List an describe the stages of development proposed by Piaget Explain how empathy and understanding others’ viewpoints influence changes in moral reasoning over time Trace the development of language in infants and in older children   As Children, How Do We Learn About the World? Perception introduces the world Experiments using habituation and the preferential­looking technique have revealed infants’ considerable  perceptual ability Vision and hearing develop rapidly as neural circuitry develops Memory improves during childhood Infantile memory is limited by a lack of both language ability and autobiographical reference Source amnesia is common in children Confabulation, common in young children, may result from underdevelopment of the frontal lobes  Piaget emphasized stages of development Proposed that through interaction with the environment, children develop mental schemas and proceed  through stages of cognitive development Stages  Sensorimotor stage – children experience the world through their sense and develop object permanence Preoperational stage – children’s thinking is dominated by the appearance of objects rather than by logic  Concrete operational stage – children learn the logic of concrete objects  Formal operational stage – children become capable of abstract, complex thinking  We learn from interacting with others Being able to infer another’s mental state is known as theory of mind Through socialization, children move from egocentric thinking to being able to take another’s perspective Language develops in an orderly way Infants can discriminate phonemes Language proceeds from sounds to words to telegraphic speech to sentences According to Chomsky, all human languages are governed by universal grammar, an innate set of relations  between linguistic elements According to Vygotsky, social interaction is the force that develops language For language to develop, a child must be exposed to it during the sensitive period of the first few months  and years of life Terms Infantile amnesia: the inability to remember events from early childhood Assimilation: the process by which we place new information into an existing schema Accommodation: the process by which we create a new schema or drastically alter an existing  schema to include new information that otherwise would 
More Less

Related notes for PSY-0001

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit