response 7.docx

3 Pages
42 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHI 101
Professor
Professer Berg
Semester
Spring

Description
                           Reading Response 7 1. According to David Hume, what is the doctrine of necessity? In your own words,  what does he claim gives rise to this idea of necessity? (3 points) It’s universally allowed that matter in all its operations, is actuated by a  necessary force, and every natural effect is so precisely determined by the energy of  its cause that no other effect. Our   ideas   of  necessity  result   only   from   the   observation   of   constant  conjunction between events and a certain determination of our minds. 2. Hume seems to be drawing an analogy between the uniformity between motives and  voluntary actions in humans, and the uniformity between causes and effects in nature  (see pg. 400­ish). What point do you take him to be making via this analogy?  Furthermore, do you agree with this (i.e. the point you take it he is trying to make)?  Why or why not? Defend your answer in a way that shows critical engagement with  the reading. (3 points)           Not only the conjunction between motives and voluntary actions is as regular and  uniform as that between the cause and effect in any part of nature; but also this regular  conjunction has been universally acknowledged among mankind and has never been the  subject of dispute.           I agree because objects will always be conjoined together which we find to have  always been conjoined; it may seem superfluous to prove that this experienced uniformity  in human action is a source whence we draw inferences concerning them. In your own words, what does Hume mean by the doctrine of liberty? Why does he  3. say it is essential to morality? Do you agree? Why or why not? (3 points) Doctrine of liberty means that as a power to act in the way we most desire to  act (free will). It’s essential to morality because actions can be given a moral value only if  they are indications of the internal character, passions, and affections. I agree. The reason is that if actions arise from external factors, they can give  rise neither to praise nor blame. 4. What is the difference between first­order desires and second­order desires, and what  is it that makes a person “wanton” on Frankfurt’s account? Give an example of a  wanton individual.
More Less

Related notes for PHI 101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit