Textbook Notes (368,150)
United States (205,954)
Psychology (112)
PSY 625 (15)
Chapter

Ch 15.docx

9 Pages
69 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY 625
Professor
Amy Weismann De Mamani
Semester
Spring

Description
Ch. 15 Social Psychology in Court 11/06/2012 How Reliable Is Eyewitness Testimony? The Power Of Persuasive Eyewitnesses Vivid anecdotes and personal testimonies can be powerfully persuasive Those who had “seen” were indeed believed even when their testimony was shown to be useless A vivid eyewitness account is difficult to erase from jurors’ minds Criminal cases with eyewitness testimony are more likely to produce convictions Jurors are more skeptical of eyewitnesses whose memory of trivial details is poor – though these  tend to be the most accurate witnesses (those who pay attention to surrounding details are less  likely to attend to the culprit’s face) When Eyes Deceive Eyewitnesses are often more confident than correct 40% witnesses identify the suspect in a lineup; 40% make no identification; 20% misidentify Confident witnesses seem more credible Confident witnesses are somewhat more accurate, especially when making quick and confident  identifications soon after the event Still, the overconfidence phenomenon effects witnesses too Moreover, some people whether right or wrong – chronically express themselves more  assertively Errors sneak into our perceptions and memories We construct our memories based partly on what we perceived at the time and partly on our  expectations, beliefs, and current knowledge The strong emotions that accompany witnessed crimes and traumas may further corrupt  eyewitness memories We are more at risk for false recollections with faces of another race The Misinformation Effect Incorporating “misinformation” into one’s memory of the event after witnessing an event and  receiving misleading information about it When questioning eyewitnesses, police and attorneys commonly ask questions framed by their  own understanding of what happened Witnesses believe their questioners are well­informed False memories feel and look like real memories Young children are especially susceptible to misinformation effect Provides one explanation for false confessions  ­ compliant confessions: confessed when worn down and often sleep deprived ­ internalized confessions: apparently believed after being fed misinformation Retelling Retelling events commits people to their recollections, accurate or not An accurate retelling helps them later resist misleading suggestions Other times, the more we retell a story, the more we convince ourselves of a falsehood We often adjust what we say to please our listeners Having done so, we come to believe the altered message Reducing Error Train Police Interviewers Begin by allowing eyewitnesses to offer their own unprompted recollections Guide people to reconstruct the setting­ have them visualize the scene and what they were  thinking/ feeling at the time After, jog memory with evocative questions “cognitive interview” substantially increases details recalled with no loss in accuracy Accurate identifications tend to be automatic and effortless (quicker identifications are generally  more accurate) Younger eyewitnesses and those who viewed the culprit for more than 1 minute are also more  accurate Minimize False Lineup Identifications If a suspect has a distinguishing feature, false identifications are reduced by putting a similar  feature on other lineup “foils” A simultaneous lineup tempts people to pick the person who most resembles the perpetrator Remind witnesses that the person they saw may or may not be in the lineup OR give  eyewitnesses a “blank” lineup that contains no suspects and screen out those who make false  identifications “sequential lineup”­ ask a witness to make individual yes or no judgments in response to a  sequence of people Stay neutral Educate Jurors To educate jurors, experts are now asked frequently to testify about eyewitness testimony Aim is to offer jurors information to help them evaluate the testimony of both prosecution and  defense witnesses What Other Factors Influence Juror Judgments? The Defendant’s Characteristics Physical Attractiveness “Beautiful people seem like good people” Baby­faced adults seem more naïve and were found guilt more often of crimes of mere  negligence but less often of intentional criminal acts If found guilty, unattractive people also strike people as more dangerous, especially is they are  sexual offenders Judges set higher bails and fines for less attractive defendants Similarity To The Jurors More sympathetic to a defendant who shares their attitudes religion, race, or gender Juror racial bias is usually small, but jurors do exhibit some tendency to treat racial out­groups  less favorably “Blacks are overpunished as defendants or undervalued as victim, or both” Harsher sentences to those who look more stereotypically black More sympathetic toward a defendant with whom we can identify Ex: In acquaintance­rape trials, men more often than women judge the defendant not guilty When the evidence is clear and the individu
More Less

Related notes for PSY 625

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit