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Chapter 5

CHICANO 10B Chapter Notes - Chapter 5: Nonperson


Department
Chicana and Chicano Studies
Course Code
CHICANO 10B
Professor
Gaye Theresa Johnson
Chapter
5

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TEXT CITATION: Johnson, Gaye Theresa. “Spaces of Conflict, Sounds of Solidarity.”
University of California Press. Chapter 5.
1-2 sentence summary
Racial injustice experienced by blacks and browns have led them
to create discursive and soundscapes in an attempt to fight for
social justice.
What is the main
question or questions
that this author is
trying to answer?
How do blacks and browns integrate themselves into a
predominantly white society efficiently, and by taking up their
entitled space?
What kind of
approach does the
author use to answer
their questions/what
discipline are they
coming from?
The author is considering the material and spatial realities faced
by the minority communities and their attempt to occupy them in
the area of Los Angeles. Uses her background and considers the
minority point of view.
What important
concepts or theories
are presented?
Seems to be a correlation between economic wealth and ability
to take up space.
Society needs to consider the divisions within humanity to fix the
twenty first century problems that Mexican and African
American communities continue to face (169).
Unfortunately, black images, style politics, popular music
generate money, but they are generating revenue for the white
communities and white corporate owners.
Using spatial racism, whites have taken advantage of minority
communities in the form of housing rights discrimination,
educational structures, and job discrimination, (177).
What is the author’s
main argument or
conclusions?
“It has always been easier, it will always be easier, to think of
someone as a non-citizen than to decide that he is a non-person,
which is the point of the Dred Scott decision,” (175).
Black and Mexican communities can take up soundspaces,
instead of physical space; the only space they had available to
them.
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