178 book 59.docx

8 Pages
119 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 178
Professor
Lofchie
Semester
Spring

Description
178 book 59­78 It was pointed out in chapter 2 that mechanism was “in the air” in Freud’s Europe. This  also was true in the US in the early 1900s. There was ferment about the general laws of  mechanics, the notion that energy can be transformed in myriad manners­ ideas that  contributed heavily to the industrial revolution in America. It was in this atmosphere that  Clark Hull, an early robotic engineer, formulated his general theory an linked it with  experiment psychology. The biologically based conceptions of ethology and, much later,  sociobiology were not devised an experiment theories. Rather, they happened to be  applicable to motivational issues. It is even arguable that Freud chiefly had as his goal the  formulation of a motivational theory. In contrast, Hull not only devised an experimentally  based motivational theory, he also had motivation at the center of his thoughts. It is  uncertain whether Hull should be credited with the formulation of the first experimentally  guided motivational theory­ both Kurt Lewin, discussed in the next chapter, and Edward  Tolman, also considered in this chapter, were developing their theories about the same  time as Hull. But there is no doubt that, In the US, Hull was the first dominant  motivational figure. There also can be no doubt about Hull’s acceptance of the metaphor that the person is a  machine. In 1943 he wrote, ‘’ the behaving organism [is] a completely self­ maintaining  robot’’; and he later remarked,’’ it has struck me many time of late that the human  organism is on e of the most extraordinary machines­ and yet a machine. Freud and Hull: Some Conceptual comparisons Freud and Hull had dissimilar backgrounds and training: Contrast the culture of Vienna  with a log cabin in Michigan and the study of medicine with mining engineering. In spite  of these historical differences, there are many similarities in the 2 men’s conclusion about  motivated behavior. First of all, both Freud and Hull were determinists. That is, they  assumed that acts are caused and that the cause can be identified. Second, both believed  that physicological and psychological laws complement one another. In addition they  accepted tension (need) reduction as the basic goal of behavior, with organisms striving  to maintain a state of internal equilibrium (homeostasis). They also both believe in the  principle of hedonism, that is, behavior is guided by the pleasure­pain principle. And  finally, both were greatly influenced by Darwin and searched for the functional  significance of action. There also are some fundamental disparities in the theoretical systems and the method  employed by these 2 researchers.  Hull    did not conceive of the organism as a closed   energy system. Rather, he believed that prolonging deprivation, or needs originating from  multiple sources such as hunger and thirst, increase the total energy available for “work:.  In addition, as indicated in chapter 2, Freud did not place much faith in laboratory  experiment, his data were free associations drawn from therapy, his personal dreams, or  the reported dreams of his patients. On the other hand, Hull’s data were generated in  carefully controlled experimental studies, primarily of rats running through a maze for a  reward of food. Further, Hull was explicitly quantitative in his approach, formulating  behavioral postulates from which exact hypotheses could be derived. The majority of his  concepts were anchored to operational definitions. For example, he defined hunger in  terms of hours of deprivation, indexed habit strength as the number of reinforced  responses, and so on. Freud was little concerned with the precision of his concepts and  their measurement. Finally, Hull denied the mental processes are determinants of any  action. Thus, for example, the idea of “ purposive’’ behavior, or action undertaken ‘’ in  order to get something’’, was accounted for entirely by bodily reaction, without appealing  to mental capacities and properties such as foresight and anticipation. As preciously  pointed out, although Freud used many mechanical or physicality concepts in his  discussion of human behavior, he also believed that thoughts do influence action; for  example, the ego can inhibit overt action by invoking a defense such as repression to  prevent a with from entering consciousness. Even instincts were regarded by Freud as ‘’  demands made on the mind’’ thus Hull was much more mechanistic in his approach to  motivation than was Freud.  In this chapter, hulls theory is presents along with some of it precursors and subsequent  elaborations. I will not document the shortcoming of this conception in any detail;  criticisms already have been voiced in numerous sources. Rather , I will portray this  theory primarily from the point of view of it adherents, and focus on it mechanistic roots.  Various phenomena that have been analyzed from a Hullian Framework, including  anxiety, conflict, frustration, social facilitation,, and cognitive dissonance, will be  examined because they are particularly relevant to human motivation. Mechanistic Learning Theory Prior to Hull Hullian theory was partly derived from, and is part of the context of, the growth and  centrality of learning theory in the US. This field of study dominated psychology from its  initial experimental beginnings until, perhaps, 1955. In the early 1900s, operant or  instrumental learning was first systematically examined by Edward Thorndike (1911).  Thorndike began his investigations in the basement of William James’ home in the mid­ 1870. His general procedure was to place an animals, frequently a cat or a chick, in an  enclosed box, outside of which food was placed. If the  animal made the ‘’ correct’’  response­ the one the experimenter had designated as the response that would release it  from the box­ then it received the food. Thorndike observed that initially the animal  engages in relatively random (trial and error) behavior until it accidentally emits the  response that results in its release. When returned to the box, the animal makes that  response sooner and sooner. Ultimately, the correct response becomes the most  immediate in the animal’s response hierarchy, or repertoire. To explain this change in response hierarchies, or learning, Thorndike postulated his  well­known ‘’law of effect’’, which state that when a stimulus­response bond is followed  by a satisfying state of affairs, the strength of the bond increases. Conversely, when a  stimulus­response bond is followed by an annoying state of affairs, the strength of the  bond is weakened. This has been called a ‘’hedonism of the past.’’ And is contrasted with  Freud’s formulation, which is a ‘’hedonism of the future.’’ Thorndike believed that  reward or punishment strengthens or weakens the preceding response, while Freud  contented that anticipated pleasure or pain determines future response. The law of effect has the same consequences on behavior at an individual level as  survival principles have on behavior at a species level. Assume, for example, that an  animals may run into a light or a dark compartment to seek a reward of food, which  always is located in the dark compartment. Over time, the animal will increasing choose  to run toward the dark side; soon, this will be the choice 100% of the time. Now also  assume that organisms of a species can search for food during the day or during the night.  However, they are more likely to be caught and killed during the day. Over time, those  with a genetic disposition for night activity will survive; after many generations, only  those with nighttime tendencies will remain and the species therefore will be nocturnal.  Thus individual learning recapture in a short time frame the effects of nature and biology  over a long time frame. Thorndike’s conception, like the biological account, is indeed mechanistic. No mention is  made of higher mental processes. Rather, the contiguous association of a stimulus and a  response, along with the presence of a reinforce (satisfier), produces a mechanically rigid  coupling, or an adhesion; the satisfier provides the ‘’glue’’ for the stimulus­response  association. Hull was greatly influenced by Thorndike and accepted that reinforcement  provided the necessary ‘’cement’’ for the establishment of stimulus response connections. Thorndike knew that if an animal was not hungry­ that is, was not’’motivated’’­ then it  would not engage in the associated action. However, he did not incorporate motivational  rules into his behavioral system. This was precisely the problem that engaged Hull. The Drive Concept Prior to the advent of Hull, motivational concepts were used to explain a different set of  phenomena than those focused on by learning theorist. The behaviors seet aside for  motivation were grouped under the term instinct, the so­called inner urges that were  striving for expression. But , as already explained, the instinct doctrine was called into  question in the 1920s, primarily because it was capriciously  invoked to account for all  behavior. In the face of severe criticism, the use od instinct as an explanatory principle  began to wana (see beach 1955) however, as is so often true in science, the theory or  construct did not die­­­ it was replaced. The concepts od instinct was replaced by the  concept of drive. ……………….. Early experimental investigation Guided by the concept of drive Various experimental procedures were established in the 1920s to assess the  strength and the consequences of deprivation (drive) on behavior. A number of studies,  particularly those by Richter (1927), demonstrated that deprivation is related to general  level of activity. That is, the greater that level of deprivation, the more active the  organism becomes until enervation from lack of food sets in . of course, id an animal is  active when deprives, it is more likely to find the needed goal object. Thus the  relationship between deprivation and activity was believed to have survival values. The  pervasive influence of Darwin thus again is evident.   In addition, Richter observed cyclical variations in behavior, with a period of  relative activity followed by a period od quiescence. In one investigation of the linkage  between periods of activity and hunger, Richter allowed rats to eat whenever they  desired. Activity level and consumption were measured. It was found that the period of  maximum food intake corresponsed to the time of maximum activity. Thus it was again  concluded that activity is related to specific physiological (tissue) deficits. Start box▯electric Grid▯Goal object 3.1 the Columbia obstruction box a second general experimental procedure for studying drive effect made use of what is  known as the Columbia obstruction box (see figure3.1). in investigations using this  apparatus, animals were first deprived of a commodity necessary for survival, such as  food or water. Then an incentive relevant to the drive(for example, food for a hungry  organism) was placed in the goal chamber. Between the organism and the goal object was  an electrical grid. The animal had to cross the grid and receive a shock to obtain the goal. Investigation making use of the obstruction box varied the strength of the ‘’drive to  action’’ which was considered to be a function of the number of hours of deprivation, and  the strength of ‘’resistance,’’ which, in turn, was a function of the magnitude of shock.  The general finding was that there is a monotonic relationship between deprivation the  a
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 178

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit