Class Notes (836,220)
Canada (509,694)
ATOC 184 (67)
Lecture 10

ATOC 184 – Lecture 10.docx

12 Pages
72 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences
Course
ATOC 184
Professor
Eyad Atallah
Semester
Winter

Description
ATOC 184 – Lecture 10 February 6 , 2014 From last class ­ As air rises, it cools. As it sinks, it warms   ­ In order to create a cloud, air particle must be lifted enough so that it reaches its  dewpoint temperature  ▯once this happens, RH needs to reach 100%, and when it  does, cloud forms ­ Additional complication: process of condensation (when RH is 100%) warms up  the air ▯ o there are two rates of cooling: 1) 10deg C per K, constant as long as RH is less   than 100% (dry adiabatic lapse rate) 2) when RH is 100%, condensation happens,  so particulars warm, and the atmosphere is made less stable (moist adiabatic lapse  rate) ­ Because of the second factor, it’s possible for the air particle to warmer than its  environment ­ Whether the parcel continues to rise or sinks back to its original position depends  on temperature: if the parcel is warmer than the surrounding air, it will rise. If it’s  colder than the surrounding air, it will be colder and sink ­ Dry adiabatic lapse rate is constant at 10C per k, moist ALR depends on  temperature   *Near the surface and at very cold temperature, dry and moist ALR are very  similar, because there isn’t much moisture in the atmosphere (even if it’s  saturated, not enough moisture) ­ So cold region: they will be similar. Tropics: very different Example: ­ ALR = gamma = v (environment) ­ Moist ALR = v(m) ­ Dry ALR = v(d)  ­ If balloon of air sinks back to original position, considered stable ­ **Any time environmental ALR is smaller than moist ALR, it will always be  stable (and moist will always be smaller than dry) ­ ­ BUT if parcel is warmer than environment, it will consider to rise  ▯called  conditional instability. ­ “Conditional” because it is only unstable if RH is 100% (if we’re using the  MOIST ALR) ­ If RH was not at 100%, we would use the dry rate… so what would happen?  When the parcel lifts, it would cool at 10 d C per K  ▯so instead of being 23C, it  would be 20C, at which point it would be colder than the environment and would  sink back down ­ So the meaning of conditional instability is that it is instable IF saturated (RH =  100%) ­ Red line = dry ALR ­ Blue line = moist ALR ­ Temperature increasing to the right ­ If gamma environment (aka actual temperature) is in blue = absolutely unstable;  green = conditionally unstable; red = absolutely stable (depends on the slope of  the line) ­ Usually one of the last two (conditionally unstable or absolutely stable) ­ First two don’t really exist except in very small time periods in small areas ­ Example: starts at ground level at 30d C. Lift the parcel until it reaches its  dewpoint – at this time, use dry ALR, so it cools at 10 d C per K. Once it reaches  its dewpoint, you have to switch to moist ALR ­ **At the point that RH = 100%, switch to moist ­ That’s when you can compare your parcel of air to environment  ­ Red line is temp of parcel, we can see that it started to lift, was colder than enviro,  but when it gets to the point that its saturated, it begins to warm and becomes  warmer than its enviro ­ The question then becomes how do we get it up to that point where it warms/is  saturated  ▯we actually need a mechanism to get it to a point where its buoyant  and will form a cloud ­ Level of free convection = when it becomes warmer than enviro and rises on its  own ­ So the more unstable the enviro, the more intense the precipitation underneath it  will be  Lifting Mechanisms (ways in which the parcel reaches the level of free convection) ­ Can have cold air cutting warm air… since cold air is more dense, it pushes the  warm air up and out of the way  ▯cold front (A) ­ Air pushed up along a mountain (C) ­ Low pressure system at the surface with air rising up (D) ­ AIRMASSES AND FRONTS ­ In meteorology, an air mass is a large volume of air that has similar characteristics  of temperature and water vapor content (moisture) ­ Air masses form when air remains over relatively flat terrain with uniform surface  characteristics for an ext
More Less

Related notes for ATOC 184

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit