Class Notes (838,347)
Canada (510,861)
ATOC 184 (67)
Lecture

Tues, Feb 18.docx

13 Pages
111 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences
Course
ATOC 184
Professor
Eyad Atallah
Semester
Winter

Description
Tuesday, February 18, 2014 All About Lake Effect Snow … hehe oops! Conceptual Picture - Experienced by almost all areas near great lakes - Two basic ingredients: relatively cold air mass and a relatively warm body of  water - Arrows are wind barbs – comes from land, over the water, and back to land again o Divergence over first mass of land: wind speed is increasing as we go  from land to water, becau fret on  (high friction to low friction) - The lake effect snowstorm always occud ro onw hde  side of the lake o Never on upwind side, because on upwind side, we have divergence at the  surface, and air that is sinking – it warms as it comes down. We can never  get to the point where our air is saturated, because we’re constantly  warming the air up.  - As the wind moves over the lake, water is evaporated in to the air, and the  dewpoint of the air increases o As water vapour is added, it allows condensation to occur more quickly  It takes less lifting and cooling of the air to achieve condensation  and precipitation, because we’re actually starting with a situation  where there’s more moisture  The longer the air spends over water, the more water vapour its  going to absorb, and the easier it is to produce precipitation (and  the heavier it might be) Climatology - Much can be explained by lake­air temperature differences o We need a large temperature difa fere acee  mperature must be  greater than the air temp   When is this most likely to happen?   • Water cools off much more slowly than air does, so the  largest differences tend to be in the beginning of winter  (Oct – Jan) • In the spring, the air temperature starts to warm, but the  water temperature is relatively cool  - Occurrence of ice o If the lake freezes, the lake effect snow process shuts off – can’t get  vapour from the lake in to the air  - Topography o Whether there are things like mountains in the way, etc. - Air residence time o The larger the lake, the more time the air spends over the water o Works for the ocean as well – this process can occur over the ocean  Just that it’s most common around the great lakes in Canada and  the US When? - Lake Effect is most likely in the early­mid winter when lake waters are still  relatively warm   - Looking for a large difference between the lake and the air, at the time where the  lake is warmer than the air Where? - Downwind of any large body of water - Lake effect snow season starts earlier in the North, because the lakes freeze  sooner - Hudson Bay is a good lake effect snow producer, but it tends to freeze up Climatology: Where else? - Anywhere you have a cold air source and open water, it’s possible Climatology: How much? - Mean annual snowfall: 100 +  inches in the snowbelts to the lee of the lakes o 200+  inches in the Tug Hill Plateau in NY, to the lee of Lake Ontario and  on the Keweenaw Peninsula of northern Michigan, to the lee of Lake  Superior - Records: o 5­10 in per hour documented o Day: 68 in at Adams, NY on 1//76  172 cm – calling in army to rescue people, because impossible to  plow o 4 days: 102 in at Oswego, NY 1/27­31/66 o Month: 149 in at Hooker, NY in 1/77 o Year: 466.9 in (1186 cm) at Hooker, NY 1976­77 o All downwind of either Lake Ontario or Erie Factors Producing Lake­Effect - Instability o How warm lake is vs. how cold air is - Fetch o How long is the air spending over the water  - Wind shear o Changes in windspeed or direction with height o Looking for the wind to be relatively consistent throughout the bottom  3km of the atmosphere  - Upstream moisture - Upstream lakes o The number of lakes and how many bodies of water an air parcel goes  over makes a difference - Orography/topography o Mountains - Snow/ice cover on lake  Instability - Example of a conditionally unstable atmosphere in which the envi ronmental lapse rate is 8deg C per km - Say lake is 2 C, and air is ­15 C o Its ­15 C, even at 1km up in the atmosphere o This is the difference between the lake temp and the air temperature of 17  C in a distance of 1 km  The atmosphere is absolutely unstable, because the dry adiabatic  lapse rate is 10 C/km, and our actual lapse rate is 17 C/km • If we took an air parcel over the lake (2 C) and lifted it 1  km, it would only cool off to 8 … if your air temp is ­15,  that air parcel is gonna go right up because its warmer than  the surrounding air • We look for situations where the atmosphere is absolutely  unstable .. doesn’t matter if we’re dry or moist o Look temperature differenc oesr 10  C from the  surface to 1­2 km up in the atmosphere - Depth of instability: relates to the depth of mixed layer. Difficult to get heavy  snow if depth of mixed layer  T850 (1.3 km) > 13 C gives absolute  instability/vigorous moisture transport Depth of Instabililty - Typical sounding for an intense lake effect band - Winds are blowing all from west or southwest o And not a huge change in windspeed moving u
More Less

Related notes for ATOC 184

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit