Class Notes (838,386)
Canada (510,872)
Biology (Sci) (2,472)
BIOL 305 (43)
Lecture

Jan 24-Bryozoa & other lophophorates.docx

3 Pages
89 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology (Sci)
Course
BIOL 305
Professor
Virginie Millien
Semester
Winter

Description
24/1/14 Phylogenies differ mostly in the small branches in the protostomes Arthropods and annelids (both segmented) were thought to be sister phylum with  onochopherans (velvet worms) as the evolutionary intermediate. However, it was found  that annelids and mollusks both have trochophore larvae. So either trochophore larvae or  segmentation were invented twice. Turns out segmentation has been invented a bunch in  nature Lophotrochozoa: clade based on molecular studies. Have either trochophore larva or  lophophore feeding structures Lophophorates: ­ Lophophore: Shared by the lophopherate phyla. Series of hollow tentacles that are  extensions of the coelom filled with filled (rigid), lined with cilia with mucous  secretions. The cilia draw particles towards the interior where the mouth is ­ Includes: Bryozoa, entoprocta, cycliophora in one clade ­ Phoronida, brachiopoda clearly have lophphores so they’re included too ­ U­shaped gut: mouth and anus aren’t not too far apart. Often, these zooids live in  colonies and share a common coelom so excretion needs to come out somewhere ­ Cyphonautes larva ­ Sedentary ­ Most are colonial (except for some phoronids), hydroid­like ­ Almost all are marine species, though there are some freshwater ­ Possess both protostome and deuterostome traits: o Proto: blastopore becomes mouth o Deutero: radial cleavage, tripartite coelom (something that byozoans do  have, but most protostomes don’t) ­ 5 phyla: Brachiopoda, phoronida, byozoa (aka ectoprocta), entoprocta,  cycliophora (don’t have quite great lophophore, though shown to be closely  related entoprocs via molecular data) Phyla info: Brachiopoda: ­ used to dominate the fossil record ­ 330 extant species ­ somewhat resemble bivalve mollusks (because they are bivalvic) o valves are arranged dorsal/ventral (bottom is bigger) w/ a stalk coming out  a hole in the shell to attach to substrate ­ Calcareous shell ­ May have setal hairs, unlike bivalvia ­ Lophophore does not extrude into the environment o Material is sucked into the bivalve shall and they filter it there o Coiled ­ Mantle cavity is where the water is pumped in and out o Species Lingula: live in marine tidal communities in mud where they can  burrow o Other species live on rocks or coral or other hard substrates 24/1/14 Phoronida:  only 12 extant species. Not unabundant, just not very diverse ­ solitary lophorphorates: do not have a shared coelom o live in populations not colonies ­ Build chitenous tubes (like marine annelids) o Buried in the sand or o Stick onto rocks or bore into calcareous rocks ­ Retractible lophophore (like bryozoans): passive suspension feeders ­ Sexual and asexual reproduction (budding/fission) o Mostly hermaphroditic Bryozoans (ectoprocta) ­ “moss animals”: They are encrusting and kinda look like moss (though not  actually), mostly marine ­ <5mm (small) ­ All colonial ­ Usually encased in hard exoskeleton w/ pores where lophophore can extend ­ Anus is outside the lophophore (hen
More Less

Related notes for BIOL 305

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit