Class Notes (834,820)
Canada (508,737)
ECON 302 (17)
Tom Velk (17)
Lecture

Lecture Notes

5 Pages
58 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics (Arts)
Course
ECON 302
Professor
Tom Velk
Semester
Fall

Description
• For the floor to be true, the central bank must be paying interest which is not clear in the  Mishkin notes. Better to read about this from Khan because it will be on the exam. • Supposedly the floor is what gives you the ability to set a bank rate (the floor rate) independent  of setting the quantity of reserves. If you think about the diagrams from those notes, the story is  that you can move the quantity of reserves off into the far right­hand side and still have a  positive bank rate above 0%, even though the demand curve if you continued to draw it would  long ago indicate that the banking system would not pay a positive rate of interest for those  reserves. But if the central bank is paying the commercial banks the floor rate, or something, to  hold reserves, then the theory is that the bank rate exists and the bank rate does set a floor to  all other interest rates because if we’re going through this theoretical story is (with a huge  volume of reserves), money would go at 0% rate of interest, but if the fed is supposedly paying  this positive interest rate to the banks, the banks or other investors who work with them will  never have to accept a rate lower than the floor rate because they can get that rate by either  being a bank or lending to a customer Portfolio Theory (William Baumol) KNOW FOR EXAM Notes for this will be online by tonight • The things that Baumol says here may not all stand up under the most aggressive theoretical  scrutiny but they’ll be ‘good enough for locals’ • Everybody has a portfolio, because you have a collection of investments and goods and if you  wanted to be thorough you should understand that everything you own, if you bothered to own  rather than rent it, is a capital good that pays an interest rate (they all pay the same interest at  base) • He says there are 4 things/dimensions that determine how you build a portfolio • You might imagine a world where you hold only one earning asset at a time (just cash, just  bonds, just an item), what is the world like where you have only one asset in a portfolio at one  time? A world with no risk, no transactions costs, assets and liabilities are perfectly divisible  and the instruments have an exclusively financial yield • When you do have a complicated portfolio, it’s because there is some risk, transactions cost,  imperfectly divisible assets/liabilities, and some assets may have more than simple financial  yields • Back to the world where you have only one thing • You must have no reason to hold multiple assets • In the first place, means that what you're holding has no risk so you don’t have to  hedge your position – don’t need to worry that what you hold will lose value  • Since there’s no risk, you put your portfolio entirely into the asset that offers the  highest rate of return, so if today oil stocks pay the highest rate of return, you buy only  oil, if tomorrow it’s gold you sell your oil and buy gold • Since there are no transactions costs, you might buy and sell minute­by­minute as  number one asset changes • You might be doing this with no concern over divisibility, doing this because you could  buy gold, not just in a brick but in specks at the same kind of unit­cost • As he goes on through this little story, he pretty much puts the question of bowties to  the side, if you start talking about art or collector automobiles that might be a factor but  then he drops it • The next little thing, is it’s interesting if you pursue this thinking a little more, in this  world of no risk, no transactions cost and exclusively financial yield, you don’t bother  going from oil stocks ▯ gold ▯ cars ▯ whatever because whatever you hold pays the  same interest as anything else and has the same risk pattern as anything else (no risk  pattern), that is to say that if it were true that you would prefer to hold oil when it’s  paying a little more, it couldn’t be that oil was paying less than gold because nobody  would buy any gold in such a situation. In this case, gold would fall until it’s dividend  payout would rise until it was higher/the same as oil and you would quickly discover  that everything pays the same dividend yield • So you could, if you wanted, not have a one­asset portfolio, you could have multiple  assets since it doesn’t matter because everything has the same ______ • You could even soften the assumption of no risk because everything would have the  same risk • If there was a little risk in oil but a lot in gold, it would price itself out in terms of a yield  change (??) • Therefore you’ll do equally well no matter what you hold or how many things • In this world, cash would have to pay a yield/dividend rate because otherwise you  wouldn’t hold it, or only for a nanosecond as you move from one asset to another (if  you wanted to do so for whimsical reasons) • Now let’s talk again about diversified portfolios in terms of releasing these constraints • Starts talking about transactions cost • Indivisibilities  • Various kinds of transactions costs and their impacts • Tolkien (sp?) reports: o Fixed fee per transaction – tends to cause a clumping, reduces frequency of  turnover by making it expensive to shift from one basket to another (save up  changes and make a bunch of alterations all at once) o Fee on the number of different assets in the transactions – un­clump, less  diversification in the total holding • Fee based on total value of assets – tends to reduce the size of the portfolio since  bigger ones are more expensive • Portfolios of Cash and one period bonds (Figure 1 in text) • Diagram between tomorrow and today • You have an amount of wealth you can start out with • Consumption access, you're going to consume your wealth (C0 today and C1  tomorrow) • You can have cash or some kind of investment (bond) and the bond pays a rate of  interest which determines the slope of the production possibilities frontier between the  2 days • If you consume everything today (period 1), you could have a point on the horizontal  axis • You consume nothing today and put it all away, you could get to a higher point  • Slope = ­1+ i  • This will turn into an investment locus, if you put some money away at a 10% rate,  you're lending it to someone else • When you're the holder of a bond you're lending to the guy on th
More Less

Related notes for ECON 302

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit