Class Notes (836,966)
Canada (509,984)
ECON 302 (17)
Tom Velk (17)
Lecture

Lecture Notes

7 Pages
128 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics (Arts)
Course
ECON 302
Professor
Tom Velk
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 5 09/19/2013 Look at Dunn p. 347 Bob Dunn • Keynesian, but skeptical of it Criticisms of the model that Dunn either didn’t mention or sort of slid over  (especially to the extent that these have political dimension, don’t need to know any of  this for the exam. Just need to be able to repeat Dunn or Tinbergen for the exam) • Helicopter level criticism: who pays, with respect to the IS curve? The government is borrowing and  spending money like crazy, but where does that money come from? The whole Keynesian fantasy is  really about redistribution and in an odd way, Obama does seem to understand the idea of taking from  the rich and giving to his voters and this is really what Keynes is all about. Who is suffering to bring  about export­led growth (part of Dunn’s story), floating exchange rates, manipulated exchange rates? If  we can find some suffering persons who are paying the bills, so to speak, for international policy  making, then we will once again make the argument that the story is essentially one of redistribution  rather than one where we are really adding to true output. The story will come down to this proposition:  “if you really want ot cure BOP problems or recessions (typically deficits) the only real way is to  increase domestic productivity and not to redistribute wealth from one group to another in an economy”   ▯ this is really what Dunn’s policy is  • One thing Dunn talks about is devaluation as a strategy. Sometimes, just by some sort of automatic  process that comes with floating exchange rates, or sometimes by a government act that comes along  with the idea of export­led growth, if you devalue your own currency you will stimulate exports because  now they're going to be cheaper in their eyes, that stimulus that you get from the extra exports not only  recovers the economy but ‘cures’ the BOP deficit problem because you begin to draw in foreign money  through the sale of your goods rather than having to bring that money in by borrowing it. What's wrong  with that as a strategy? • Going back to the idea of whos paying the bills? Whole population of foreigners who in the past  brought in good money who will now be forced to get their money out because of devaluation  as bad money, by going through a depreciated exchange rate. Imagine America was trying to  stimulate its exports. Initially there is a 1:1 rate between USD and CAD. The Canadians have  been investing in America – they have a million CAD and then change it into USD and they  open a ski shop in Vermont and run a business down there, they’re earning a profit. Suddenly,  Obama declares that the USD is now only worth 0.5 CAD, who is in trouble? The Canadian  guy who started the ski shop. He paid a million American dollars but now if he would like to sell  out, he would get a million American dollars but now his million American dollars is really only  worth $500 000. So, he’s lost half his investment. Even if he doesn’t sell out, when he takes  home his profits each year. If he’s earning $100 000 per year USD, now when he brings it year  he’s only earning $50 000. o There are many Chinese investments in US, if the American dollar were to weaken,  those investments, when they try to take them home to China would be much less of  an investment – they too would be cheated by an act of devaluation • There were some Americans who went into the export business as well, selling things to other  countries. They’re in the manufacturing industry selling cars to the rest of the world. When  devaluation occurs, the exporter is selling his cars and the Japanese/Russian people will buy  the American cars because its price has fallen by half with the devaluation. All these currencies  can now come in with twice the buying power. The exporter, yes, is selling more cars but when  he tries to spend his earnings abroad, he discovers that his purchasing power has exactly  fallen in half because there’s a sense in which the foreigner who sees that cars are now  cheaper, the purchasing power that the foreigner gives up in foreign markets in foreign money.  The problem with doing this is that the whole point of exporting is to import again. The  exporters are basically just accepting a lower wage – so they're paying the cost for devaluation. • Another group that pays: lets say you're a guy who is trying to buy one of these cars. The  person who is making the car has to buy imported components, some of the components might  be chromium (from Africa, Russia) so the car manufacturer has to pay a now higher price for  this input in the car that you want to buy as an American within your own country since  America has devaluated within its own country. So now the buyer of the good inside the US  has to pay a higher price.  • The whole idea that we benefit from more exports, when they follow from devaluation, can be  completely erroneous depending on the kind of market that exists for the export product. In Canada, we  are energy exporters, we supply 25% of the energy that is consumed in the US (electrical, oil, gas).  Energy, to American buyers, is like dope to a stoner, you’ve got to have it and you will pay any price.  Stoner demand is called inelastic demand. Meaning that if Canada would be so unwise as to devalue in  hopes that this would stimulate export industries, all that would happen is the stoner demand could be  paid for by Americans with less of an outlay. What you want to do when you have a product for which  there is a stoner demand on the other end of the market is raise the value of your currency so as to  extract even more from the customer who HAS TO HAVE the product. Only when your product faces  much international competition that your customers will come to you when you devalue because you  have dropped your price. With the stoners you can sell them their pack of cigarettes a day, they’ll pay it  because there’s no substitute. The interesting thing about Canadian strategy, is that they get upset  about the high value of CAD, Harper – through political action – has kept the dollar high, the high dollar  has been great for Western Canada where the energy exports come from and for Quebec where  electricity comes form. It has been less good for Central Canada where the manufacturers are because  the products of those manufacturers can be acquired from other manufacturers in other countries more  cheaply now that the Canadian dollar has gone up. It is a question of distribution because of these  impacts. • Talks also about floating exchange rates, not necessarily manipulated by governments but perhaps  toyed with governments. He says the idea that we should have floating exchange rates. What’s wrong  with that? • Contrary to one of the most fundamental ideas in economics. Adam Smith made the point that  you want a single market, ideally for the whole world, because as a manufacturer of things you  want to be able to search the whole world for the cheapest possible inputs and you want to be  able to easily acquire these inputs. In short, you want to be in the same market as the chrome  supplier if you are the chrome buyer. With a floating exchange rate, you have a barrier between  you – you don’t know what the US dollar cost of chrome from S. America is going to be if the  exchange rate between you and Ecuador changes from day to day. You could have many  experts who know everything about chromium mining, extracting and shipping but nobody  knows what the next entry will be in the book of exchange rates, you have diminished the  efficiency of an extensive market. • Also, if you're an investor who buys and sells restaurants/bars and you're going to decide  whether you should buy a bar on St Denis or expand your exist
More Less

Related notes for ECON 302

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit