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Lecture 5

POLI 244 Lecture 5: POLI 244 9-26-2016
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Department
Political Science
Course
POLI 244
Professor
Fernando Nunez- Mietz
Semester
Fall

Description
POLI 244-World Politics-9/26/2016 Reading -If the cost of cooperating and having the other partner defect is low, a state can take additional risks and wait out their decision -Thus lowering costs on both sides encourages cooperation -Small nations who have much to lose are therefore more aggressive (North Korea) -Passive invulnerability of a power is best because it will not exploit others but it can afford to be defected, so this encourages coop -Loss of sovereignty is the most severe consequence -Value of security (how risky CD is) determines aggressiveness -Perception of threat is also key to subjective security Realism and the Security Dilemma Structural Realism -Abstract minus on the idea of state power distribution -Three main elements of political structures on the international scale -Ordering principle -How each unit is related to one another -Authority vs subordination -Hierarchy or anarchyanarchy on international system -Functional differentiation -How are functions allocated amongst different political units -Legislative, bureaucratic, military, policing, etc -States should be treated as like units -Not relevant in international affairs -Distribution of capabilities -How many major players/powerbrokers are there in a system -Anarchy is a constant -Considered the only major international variable Assumptions 1. Anarchy exists 2. Great powers are rational actors, acting strategically to maximize self-interest through the info they have 3. Survival is the primary goal of every great power (Maintaining territoriality and sovereignty) 4. Every great power has some offensive capabilitymilitary capability feeds into power and ability to hurt others/use coercion 5. Uncertainty of others’ intentions an
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