Class Notes (837,998)
Canada (510,614)
Biology (2,437)
Ben Bolker (16)
Lecture

Introduction.docx

7 Pages
148 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology
Course
BIOLOGY 3SS3
Professor
Ben Bolker
Semester
Winter

Description
January 7 , 2014 Biology 3SS3: Population Ecology Introduction Ecology vs. Environmentalism, Science vs. Policy ­ Treehuggers vs. Hummer drivers ­ Ecology ≠ environmental science ≠environmentalism ­ Ecologist (in their professional capacity) should say what will happen, not what  you should do Opinions about Advocacy ­ Ecologists should not make decisions   Definitions ­ What is population ecology? What other kinds of ecology are there? ­ Hierarchical scales: • Behavioural, physiological • Population • Community (micro vs macro) • Ecosystem ­ Taxon specific: plant, animal, microbial, insect, human… Goals of Ecology ­ Goals: • Understanding (basic science) • Prediction • Control/management ­ What population are you interested in? • Human, crops, trees, fish, game, pests, invasive species, endangered  species, microbes, infected people, infected cells Population Ecology: Questions ­ What processes affect organisms’ population sizes? ­ How do population sizes respond to these effects • Why are some populations large, and others small? • Why are some cyclical and others stable? • When can similar species coexist in the same area? Math and Models ­ Population ecology uses models, and math ­ Math is a critical tool for linking processes to outcomes; it will play a central role  in the course ­ We will keep it simple (not necessarily easy) ­ Logic is more important than math, but math is still important Examples ­ Malaria • A nasty disease spread by mosquitoes • In some places (e.g., the southeasterm US) it has been eradicated almost  by accident • They still have mosquitoes there • In other places it persists at high levels despite concerted efforts at  elimination • What are the risk factors for malaria spread, and what determines when it  can be controlled? ­ Red squirrels • Native to the UK • Red squirrels are rapidly disappearing from England  Loss of suitable habitat?  Competition (for food/habitats) from gray squirrels (invasive  species) introduced form North America?  Diseases carried by gray squirrels?  More than one of the above? Synergy? ­ Gypsy moths • Introduced to North America from Eurasia • Gypsy moth defoliation • Irregular population pattern • Reduce growth rate of the trees • Dramatic population cycles: can devastate forests at peak population sizes • What causes gypsy moth population cycles, and (how) can these cycles be  better controlled?  Weather  Resource availability (food quality)  Predators (mice, birds) cannot respond fast enough  Parasitoids (wasp that lay their eggs and paralyze the moths)  Disease (virus, fungus) ­ Does the information we have for this factor big enough to be included in the  model? January 9 , 2014 Population Dynamics ­ Why are there no fish in my favourite mountain lake? • Not suitable • Fish never arrived • Fish thrived for a while and then something happened • Disease, new predator, environmental catastrophe ­ What factors will determine what will happen if I introduce some fish: depends on  the reason for why they are not there • Suitable environment (temperature, oxygen,…) • Resources (mostly food) • Competitors • Enemies – disease predators Models ­ Example: dandelions • Start with one dandelion; it produces 500 seeds, of which 1% survive to  reproduce • How many dandelions will be there after 3 years? • Spreadsheet ­ Example: rabbits • Imagine we have a population of rabbits • Baby rabbits become adults after one month • Each pair of adult rabbits produces one pair of baby rabbits each month • Rabbits never die • What happens to this population: similar to exponential growth • Spreadsheet • These are the Fibonacci numbers What is a Model? ­ A model is a set of assumptions that can be used to make predictions ­ For example, we make assumptions about rabbit lifespan and reproduction, and  then evaluate the consequences of these assumptions ­ Ecological models always have many unstated assumptions ­ What is an unstated assumption about the dandelion model? Models are Useful ­ Model link • Linking scales • Individual­level actions and population­level effects • Wh
More Less

Related notes for BIOLOGY 3SS3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit