Class Notes (837,139)
Canada (510,117)
Brock University (12,132)
Lecture 19

Lecture 19 (November 14).docx

6 Pages
105 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Health, Aging and Society
Course
HLTHAGE 1BB3
Professor
Jessica Gish
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 19 (Thursday, November 14, 2013) – Retirement Income Scheme  Allowance (ALW) ­ Helps out couples with only one retirement income until both are eligible for OAS ­ There were 93 000 recipients in January 2009 ­ Most were women  Government Transfers ­ Strengths  1. Reduction of poverty rates 2. Guarantees a single, older person an income on OAS/GIS of $15 438.12/year ­ Weaknesses 1. Some seniors depending on where they live report income levels below low­income cut­offs (cost of  living is higher in some urban areas)  Tier Two: Public Pension Plans (CPP/QPP) ­ Overview ­ 2009: paid over $21 billion to 3.6 million retirees ­ Funding arrangements ­ It is a pay­as­you­go plan ­ CPP Board began investing the surplus in financial markets in 1998 to increase the size of the fund ­ Government sets contribution rates at 9.9% of a person’s wage (vesting) ­ 4.95% ­ employee; 4.95% ­ employer  ­ Self­employed persons – 9.9%  ­ The value of CPP for a retiree ­ 2013: average amount of benefit is $528.49/month (or $6341.99/year); max benefit is  $1012.50/month (or $12150/year) ­ There was concern giving that this was a transfer fund ­ What has happened is that the government has created an independent ward and they are responsible  for stocking the circa for the retiree Video Clip 1 Lecture 19 (Thursday, November 14, 2013) – Retirement Income Scheme  ­ 10s of thousands run to the mall in east London  ­ Canada owns 25% of this mall because of the Canadian Pension Plan  ­ With inflation rising and the Euro dipping, on behalf of Canadians why would we be investing in UK  retail? ­ This expert has more knowledge or body than individuals monitoring their own stock  Public Pension Plans 1. Strengths  ­ Portable ­ Protects people from inflation ­ Provides survivor and disability benefits 2. Weaknesses ­ Limited for workers that work part­time, experience high rates of unemployment, or do seasonal work ­ Supports a male “industrial” factory worker ­ Ignores women’s interrupted work histories ­ Because of the gender wage gap, women contribute less into their CPP plans  Video Work: Canadian Labour Congress ­ Some of the weaknesses of the pension plan that she raises are ­ It doesn’t work well for women  ­ In the past, women didn’t have jobs and they weren’t contributing to CPP ­ Part­time/seasonal work/underemployment it is resulting in people contributing less so their CPP  credit doesn’t translate to a high monetary value  ­ If you aren’t earning much, you won’t be benefiting from CPP ­ Self­employed persons don’t benefit from CPP because they have to contribute what their actual  employer would pay  Tier Three: Private Income (private pensions, savings, and work) ­ Occupational Pension Plans (RPPs)  ▯some places of employment offer this private pension plan  ­ 2000: slightly more than ½ of older people had this form of income 2 Lecture 19 (Thursday, November 14, 2013) – Retirement Income Scheme  ­ These plans are costly ­ Very common among public­sector workers ­ 2003: 87% of public sector workers were part of a RPP compared to 28% of private­sector workers Types of Registered Retirement Pension Plans (RPPs) 1. Defined benefit ­ Promises a specific level of pension income in return for a certain number of years for working for a  company ­ Outcome is clearly defined  2. Defined contribution ­ Pension income varies according to how much the employer and employee contribute into the plan  and how successfully the plans are invested  ­ Plan defines contribution but not the outcome Occupational Pension Plan ­ The value of a RPP for a retiree ­ Most defined­benefit plans pay 2% of a person’s salary times the number of years of service  ­ The average annual income for RPPs was $14 593 for men and $8 452 for women  1. Strengths ­ Beneficial for men  ▯2/3s of men compared to  ½ of women have this form of income ­ Upper­income workers get the most benefit  ▯RPPs make upto 50% of retirement income of those  who earned between $40000­$80000/year ­ RPPs make up less than 10% of retirement income of those who earned less than $20000/year 2. Weakness ­ Uncommon among non­standard workers ­ Coverage is declining (fewer unions, plans are costly) ­ Worker may lose employer contributions to their pension if they
More Less

Related notes for HLTHAGE 1BB3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit