Class Notes (839,559)
Canada (511,394)
Philosophy (1,234)
Diane Enns (11)
Lecture

PHIOLS 2ZZ3- Lecture 1 notes

3 Pages
143 Views

Department
Philosophy
Course Code
PHILOS 2ZZ3
Professor
Diane Enns

This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full 3 pages of the document.
Description
Philosophy 2ZZ3: Philosophy of Love and Sex Winter 2014 Instructor: Dr. Diane Enns Class times: Wednesdays and Fridays, 9:30­10:20 p.m., MDCL 1105 Note: This course will be on Avenue to Learn and assignments will be submitted to Turnitin.com Office Hours in UH 318: Wednesdays 12 ­ 2 p.m. (or by appointment) Tel. 905­525­9140 x 27529 Email: [email protected] Description: In this course we will explore a number of philosophical questions regarding the nature and experience of erotic or  romantic love, using both historical and contemporary philosophical and literary texts. Our focus will be on  the paradoxesthat make romantic love one of the most perplexing and painful but exhilarating experiences of human  life. Aside from the obvious question—what is love?—we will consider the following: Is love a universal emotion? Is  romantic love a cultural construct? What is distinct about sexual love from other forms of love? How do we distinguish  love from desire, lust or need? Do we idealize the person we love romantically (is love blind)? What is the nature of  desire? Can we reason philosophically about love? How do we experience rejection or the death of love? What is the  relationship between sex and love? Does intimacy have a dark side? What can neuroscience tell us about love? Texts: Plato, Symposium Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality: An Introduction Gillian Rose, Love's Work Courseware Course Objectives: To become familiar with some major texts on love in the history of Western philosophy To reflect critically on the timeless as well as the socio­historically contingent meanings of romantic or erotic love To express, creatively and philosophically, ideas about love To understand the complicated psychological, social and emotional dynamics of human love relationships and  consider these philosophically To improve the written and oral expression of ideas Assignments: 4 Short Writing Assignments (600­900 words, 10% each) = 40% Love Project = 25% Final Exam = 25% Tutorial Participation = 10% 1. Four short writing assignments (600­900 words [2­3 pages], 10% each) = 40% These short assignments will be responses to questions given two weeks in advance. The questions will ask you to  compare the ideas of at least two of the texts from the course readings. The purpose of this assignment is to help you  keep up with the readings and to reflect critically on the assigned texts. They will also help prepare you for the final  exam and develop your writing skills. More information will be provided, and the questions posted, on Avenue. In this course we will be using a web­based service (Turnitin.com) to reveal plagiarism. Students will be expected to  submit their work electronically to Turnitin.com and in hard copy on the day papers are due so that they can be  checked for academic dishonesty. Students who do not wish to submit their work to Turnitin.com must still submit  a copy. No penalty will be assigned to a student who does not submit work to Turnitin.com. All submitted work is  subject to normal verification that standards of academic integrity have been upheld (e.g., on­line search, etc.). To  see the Turnitin.com Policy, please go to HYPERLINK "http://www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity"  www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity Hard copies of these assignments must be submitted at the start of class the day they are due. They are not to be  submitted to anyone else or in the Philosophy department office or under anyone's office door. Assignments will not  be graded until a hard copy is received. Each assignment will be given a mark out of 10, toward a final grade of 40% of the total grade. These assignments  will be graded by your T.A. and returned to you in your tutorial within two weeks. No late assignments will be accepted, except under extenu
More Less
Unlock Document

Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit