Class Notes (837,291)
Canada (510,219)
Psychology (5,220)
PSYCH 2NF3 (75)
Lecture

ocipital lobes.docx

13 Pages
117 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 2NF3
Professor
Ayesha Khan
Semester
Winter

Description
March 6 , 2014 Psych 2NF3: Basic and Clinical Neuroscience Occipital Lobes Vision ­ Dominant perception ­ Optic tract collect at thalamus to the lateral geniculate nucleus ­ Lands in area V1 (primary visual cortex) ­ Also involve parietal and temporal lobes collectively ­ From V1 information goes off to secondary and tertiary structures ­ V1: information is gathered and further moves on ­ Start to add information related to motion, colour, an depth which increases the  complexity of the visual sensory signal Anatomy of the Occipital Lobes ­ No clear division on lateral surface of brain ­ Medial surface • Parieto­occipital surface: division between parietal and occipital lobe (this  division is not seen in the temporal lobe but instead we have a gyrus) • Clacarine sulcus: divides the upper and lower parts of a visual field  Important in providing a division  Contains much of primary visual cortex  Separates upper and lower visual fields  Areas above tend to encode information about the upper part of the  visual field  Lower sulcus encodes the lower part of the visual field ­ Vwntral surface • Lingal gyrus: where temporal lobe begins, there is a transition  V2 and VP • Fusiform gyrus  V4 ­ There are six layers to the human cortex, when we look at the occipital cortex,  visual area 1 is suspected to have more than six layers ­ Complexity of the system: there is still information about how visual area 1  functions that we don’t know about because of the fact that it has more than six  layers ­ May be additional functions of the primary visual cortex that we don’t know  about Subdivisions of the Occipital Cortex ­ Area V1 • Laminar organization most distinct of all cortical areas • Heterogenous  Has more than one distinct function  Heterogenous in appearance; but what about function?  Do have more than one function  Preserved in V2  Thin and thick stripes  Thin stripes involved in colour perception: feed further information  to areas that are involved in colour perception  Thick stripes: motion and form perception  Blobs and interblobs  Blobs are metabolically more active and stain deeper and are  thought to be involved in colour perception  Interblobs (cells between the blobs) are thought to be sensitive to  orientation  From V1 to V2 there is movement of information  ­ Striate cortex (also known as V1) • There are striations that exist in this area • Another name for the visual cortex due to its striped appearance ­ Colour vision • Primary job of V4 (fusiform gyrus), but distributed throughout occipital  cortex • Plays a role in detection of movement, depth and position Connections of the Visual Cortex ­ Primary Visual Cortex (V1) • Input form LGN • Output to all other levels ­ Secondary Visual Cortex (V2) • Output to all other levels • Must be able to discriminate information ­ After V2 • Output to the parietal lobe – dorsal stream • Output to the inferior temporal love – ventral stream • Output to the superior temporal sulcus (STS sits between the parietal and  temporal lobe) – STS stream ­ Dorsal stream: visual guidance of movement ­ Ventral: recognition of an object ­ STS: important in visual spatial functions. • Important in discrimination • What the object is doing within the context of its appearance and  movement • Combines what and where • Space related information Visual Pathways ­ Dorsal stream: visual guidance of movements ­ Ventral stream: object perception ­ STS: visuospatial functions (what and where) A Theory of Occipital Lobe Function ­ Vision begins in V1 (primary visual cortex) that is heterogeneous, and then travels  to more specialized cortical zones ­ Blobs (V1) to area V4 (colour) ­ Interblobs (V1) to area MT/V5 (motion) – superior temporal sulcus ­ V1 and V2 to area V3 (shapes of objects in motion) ­ Selective lesions up the hierarchy produce specific visual deficits ­ Lesions to V1 are not aware of seeing • Reply that they see nothing • They do indeed see • Reflexively respond to objects • Behaves as if they are blind but there is still visual input • Conscious awareness of vision Visual Functions Beyond the Occipital Lobe ­ Monkey studies ­ Vision­related areas in the brain make up about 55% of the total cortex ­ Used as the primary sensory modality ­ Estimates are close to what happens in the human brain ­ Multiple visual regions in the temporal, parietal, and frontal lobes ­ Vision • Not unitary, composed of many quite specific forms of processing • Five categories of vision Five Categories of Vision ­ Vision for action: involved in specific and direct movements • Parietal visual areas in the dorsal stream • Reaching • Ducking • Catching • Bottom up ­ Action for vision • Top­down: selective attention • Visual scanning • Eye movements and selective attention • More of a top­down: focus of attention • Bottom up: occurs due to interaction with a stimulus, driven by interaction  with an object • Looking at the bust: change direction based on the attention to specific  instruction • In individuals with brain damage related to occipital cortex there is  random movement • Even if occipital areas are intact there is some deficit in attention ­ Visual recognition • Temporal loves • Object recognition ­ Visual space • Parietal (and temporal loves) • Spatial location  Location of an object relative to person (egocentric space)  Location of an object relative to another (allocentric space) ­ Visual attention • Selective attention for specific visual input • Parietal lobes guide movements and temporal lobes help in object  recognition Visual Pathways Beyong the Occipital Lobe ­ Milner and Goodal • The dorsal stream is a set of systems for on­line visual control of action • Evidence:  Visual neurons in parietal cortex are active only when the brain  acts on visual information  3 pathways run from V1 to the parietal cortex, must be functionally  dissociable  Visual impairments after parietal lesions can be characterized as  visuomotor or orientational  Parietal = a lot of vision and somatosensory  From V1 information can go directly to dorsal stream processing to  area V5 involved in motion perception  Area v3 form perception parietal visual areas that are related to  visual action  V1 to V2: ventral stream processing has dynamic form information  (orientation specificity); what does the object look like once it  changes orientation ­ STS stream • Characterized by polysensory neurons  Neurons are responsive to both auditory and visual input or both 
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 2NF3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit