Class Notes (839,092)
Canada (511,185)
Psychology (5,220)
PSYCH 3CC3 (101)
Lecture 11

Lecture 11 (January 30).docx

4 Pages
50 Views

Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYCH 3CC3
Professor
Richard B Day

This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full 4 pages of the document.
Description
Lecture 11 (Wednesday, January 30, 2013)  Storage/Retrieval Factors b) Loftus, 1975 ­ Loftus is the most well­known figure in the field of human memory  ­ She gave people a questionnaire about headache and pain relief products and their experience with  headaches ­ She varied the wording in these questions for different groups of participants  Example  ▯in one case she was asking nominally the use of one particular product and she was asking  whether the individual had tried any other products and how many and there were two versions of this  question: “How many products tried. 1, 2, 3?” or “How many products tried. 1, 5, 10?”  ­ The question itself was virtually identical for both sections because they could put down any number  they wanted, but the example numbers differed for both sections  ­ Yet we saw a significant difference in the number of products listed between the two groups  ­ For the first question they averaged about 3 and for the second question they averaged about 5 ­ We don’t know why this happens, but we only know the effect about the wording of the questions  Example  ▯she asked: “Headaches frequently? How often?” or “Headaches occasionally? How often?” ­ There was a dramatic difference in the number of headaches reported ­ The average was 2/week when the word frequently was used and the average was 0.7/week when the  word occasionally was used  c) Loftus & Palmer, 1974 ­ One of the most famous experiments in cognition and memory  ­ Referred to as the “crash collide” study  ­ Showed subjects a short film clip of an auto accident then they are asked about the accident right after  they have seen the film ­ They are asked about the speed at which the cars were going when the accident occurred, but the  wording used to ask the question varied throughout 4 or 5 groups: “How fast were the cars going when  they smashed?”, “How fast were the cars going when they bumped?”, “How fast were the cars going  when they hit?”, and “How fast were the cars going when they collided?” ­ Each of these questions is essentially asking the same thing, but the implications in each of the  questions is different, particularly implications about speed  ­ There is a bias in the tone of the question  ­ If we look at the speed estimates, the average speed estimate goes up as the implied speed/intensity of  the question goes up  ­ The speed estimates are the following from each of the questions in decreasing order: bumped  (lowest), contacted, hit, collided, smashed (highest) 1 Lecture 11 (Wednesday, January 30, 2013)  ­ This study has been replicated several times  ­ Then a week later the participants are asked to come back and they are now asked another set of  questions about the video they saw a week before ­ In this case they are asked, “was there any glass on the ground at the scene of the accident?” ­ There wasn’t any glass actually at the scene of the accident ­ Now we look at the proportion of participants in each of the groups that said yes to the question above ­ Most people say no because that is true, but the proportion that say that there was rises as a function  of the question that was initially asked  ­ The control was not asked anything regarding speed during the first portion of this study (no bias) and  only 5% of them report seeing glass in the video  ­ When we look at the individuals who got the questions with smashed and hit as the wording, we see a  higher proportion of people saying that there was glass ­ The more force that was implicated by the speed of the vehicles, the more likely we are to get a false  memory of the presence or absence of glass on the ground  ­ This effect is directly related to the initial estimates of speed  ­ Probability of saying yes increased with subjects earlier speed estimates, regardless of word used in  question, even if the speed estimates were the same you get a higher probability if the word smashed  was used  ­ The higher the speed estimate, the more likely they were to say that they saw glass  d) Loftus & Zanni, 1975 ­ The table/a table study ­ Asked “Did you see a lamp on the table in the room?” or “Did you see a lamp on a table in the room?” ­ In English, “a” and “the” carry different implications  ­ To say “the table” is to imply that there was a table  ­ To say “a table” is to ask the question was there in fact a table there?  ­ The individuals come back a week later again and they are asked the question was there a table in the  room? (there actually wasn’t a table) ­ Individuals who has been asked about “the table” a week earlier were much more likely to say that  there was one there than the group that was asked about “a table” ­ One syllable can make a significant difference  5. Post­event information (PEI) ­ In addition to the relatively simple manipulation of the wording of leading questions, there are other  thin
More Less
Unlock Document

Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit