Class Notes (835,798)
Canada (509,410)
Psychology (5,217)
PSYCH 3CC3 (101)
Lecture

Lecture 22 (March 6).docx

8 Pages
94 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 3CC3
Professor
Richard B Day
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 22 (Wednesday, March 6, 2013)  Jury Bias Scale ­ 22 statements, 5­point scale ­ There are two sub­scales 1. Probability of commission Probability of commission = what is the likelihood that the individual on trial actually committed the  crime ­ Authoritarians tend to come into the jury believing the guilty of the defendant in the criminal justice  system because that system represents society and establishment and we are to be obedient to them  ­ There are about 10­11 statements on each of these sub­scales Example  ▯A suspect who runs from the police most probably committed the crime  ­ If you answer strongly agree, this indicates that you believe that the individual is guilty before the  trial even sets in  ­ O.J. Simpson fled the scene of the crime, so this statement can be applicable to that case Example  ▯Generally the police only make an arrest when they are sure about who committed the crime ­ Using extra evidentiary information (the fact that someone has been arrested) as an indication that  there is a high probability that he is guilty  ­ We do all have this general tendency to believe that our social systems work as they are intended to,  so we do have a small or large bias to believe that the person, if arrested, is likely to be a guilty party 2. Reasonable doubt Reasonable doubt = the standard of guilt or innocence in criminal cases in the west ­ You have to believe that the individual committed the crime as described beyond a reasonable doubt ­ This is a fairly high criterion ­ In civil trials, the criterion is the preponderance of evidence ­ Reasonable doubt can mean different things to different people, but it is a much more higher standard  Example  ▯If a majority of the evidence – but not all of it – suggests the defendant committed the crime,   then the jury should vote not guilty ­ This would be support for the general standard of reasonable doubt  Example  ▯Circumstantial evidence is too weak to use in court  ­ Strong agreement with this indicates a very high belief in the standard of reasonable doubt  ­ In a number of studies, people have been given this jury bias scale and then in mock jury trials we  have looked at the relationship between their scores on this survey and their votes for innocence or  guilt 1 Lecture 22 (Wednesday, March 6, 2013)  1. Kassin & Wrightsman (1983): r = 0.30 between scale scores and verdicts (~10% of variance) ­ In general, there is a significant (but not hugely high) correlation of about 0.3 between scores on this  scale and verdicts of guilt or innocence ­ Individuals who have a high probability of commission score and a relatively low reasonable doubt  score are more likely to convict than others who have less belief in commission and a higher standard  for reasonable doubt ­ This correlation of 0.3 translates to only about 10% of our variance (because we square the  correlations to get the variance) ­ Only 10% of the variation in verdict can be attributed to and/or associated with differences in the  scores on the juror bias scale 2. Penrod & Cutler (1987): r = 0.60 between subscale scores – what is being measured? ­ How many different things is it actually measuring? ­ We have these two sub­scales, yet we are not measuring two absolutely independent things because  the correlation between those two sub­scales is about 0.6, which is very high  ­ This suggests that there is overlap in the two scales and what is actually being measured 3. Myers & Lecci (1998): Probability of commission measures two things ­ People have done factor analytic studies of the JBS  ­ This study shows that the probability of commission scale is actually measuring two different things  and we should probably separate those a) Confidence in the justice system ­ Confidence that the justice system works the way that it should  b) Cynicism toward some aspect of the justice system ­ Distrust or cynicism about the justice system  Example  ▯Most offense attorneys don’t really care about the guilt or innocence of their client, they are  just in it for the money ­ This statement is cynical  ­ The factor analysis that Myers and Lecci did suggested that there were two different things being  assessed and we might want to separate them in order to get a closer view in order to get a more  nuanced look at bias and jury verdicts  ­ They also showed that there were a couple of items on each of the scales that were not predictive of  anything (the answers of them did not relate to jury decision­making) ­ So they produced a revised JBS scale, which had a higher correlation with jury verdicts than the  original JBS 2 Lecture 22 (Wednesday, March 6, 2013)  Juror Personality and Verdicts 2. Dogmatism = almost the same as authoritarianism, the difference is that the literature suggests that  authoritarianism is fairly strongly associated with prejudice and bias against out groups, but we do not  see this in dogmatism ­ Dogmatic people are very rigid, inflexible, tend to believe in received wisdom from higher  authorities, but they just don’t tend to be prejudice or biased based on those tendencies  ­ We see the same pattern that we see in the relationship between authoritarianism and jury decision­ making in dogmatism and jury decision­making a) Individuals that are high in dogmatism are more likely to convict defendants than those low in  dogmatism (high = more likely to convict)  b) After conviction, they are more likely to suggest or imposed for harsher penalties on convicted  individuals (high = more punitive after conviction)  ­ But, the relationship is not as strong here as it is for authoritarianism (the vast bulk of literature agrees  these characteristics hold for authoritarianism, for dogmatism not all studies find this) 3. Locus of control: internal versus external External locus of control = our tendency to believe that people’s behaviour is controlled by their  circumstances and their situation  Internal locus of control = our tendency to believe that people’s behaviour tends to be controlled by  their own personal characteristics, desires, impulses, etc. ­ We can have this belief both about ourselves and others ­ A strong belief in the internal locus of control makes us belief that people are much more responsible  for what happens to them and the actions that they have taken  ­ One of the major scales for assessing locus of control is the Rotter scale (1996 – internal­external  locus of control scale) ­ Essentially, you are given pairs of statements and you are to indicate which of the pair you agree with  more  Example: ­ External  ▯In world affairs, most of us are the victims of forces we can neither understand nor control ­ Internal  ▯By taking an active part in political and social affairs, the people can control world events  Example: ­ External  ▯Many of the unhappy things in people’s lives are due to bad luck ­ Internal  ▯People’s misfortunes arise from the mistakes they make ­ Your score depends on which statement you are likely to endorse within the pair ­ You can go from no bias at all to extremely internal or external belief 3 Lecture 22 (Wednesday, March 6, 2013)  ­ Individuals who have a high belief in an internal locus of control are more likely to see defendants as  personally responsible for the actions that they have taken  a) Sosi (1974): Drunk driving case  ­ Individuals with a strong belief in internal locus of control are more likely to  i) Recommend harsher punishment ii) View defendant as more responsible ­ This effect only showed up after a decision of guilt or innocence had been reached iii) No relation between locus of control and perceived guilt  ­ The locus of control had no affect on the decision­making but only on the actual decision of how the  individual should 
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 3CC3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit