Class Notes (834,986)
Canada (508,846)
Psychology (5,208)
PSYCH 3CD3 (124)
Lecture

February 24

4 Pages
50 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 3CD3
Professor
Jennifer Ostovich
Semester
Winter

Description
Theories of Prejudice: Relative Deprivation Monday February 24, 2014 PSYCH 3CD3 Relative deprivation theory has a long history Is older than the other two by about 20­30 years If you compare your group with another group, or with how your group has been doing  over the past while, and you sense that your group isn’t doing well, you will become  upset Requires that you look around and decide that your group (and you) are not doing as well  as you should be Deprivation and Prejudice Lynchings Find a target of hatred, and kill them Picture: have hung a black man Comes from the name of a judge named ‘Lynch’ Looked at lynchings in the 50 or so year period There were just over 4700 lynchings (about 70/ year) Were mostly of blacks, and mostly where there was a lot of cotton There was a lot of variation in lynchings Some years (1929) only had 7, 142 at other times (1892 and 1893) Noticed that increases in lynchings were linked with decreases in cotton prices When farmers were not making as much money, they were lynching blacks Why does this relationship exist? When cotton prices fell, this was a frustrating event The cotton farmers felt deprived of their earners There is a big theory of frustration in social psychology: frustration­aggression  hypothesis Aggression against a handy scapegoat: blacks Frustration is being taken out on this innocent scapegoat Scapegoats are the easiest ones to attack Doing this may somehow make you feel better A Better Explanation Absolute Deprivation and Relative Deprivation Can be deprived if you are low status, poor You can be deprived every single day of your life, it doesn’t necessarily mean you are  going to go around killing There is a distinction between being deprived, and having a sense that you are deprived  relative to some standard Need to have this standard It is this comparison with another group that is dangerous Lynching data: the lynchings were at their highest right after cotton prices fell Were in a steady state (cotton prices get higher, I get richer), then boom, cotton prices fall This is when you are the most frustrated When it is steadily low, the lynchings slowed down Can make a temporal comparison: I was doing really well the other day Intergroup comparisons: my relative outgroup is doing a lot better than me, and that is  very upsetting Two types of comparisons Can have expectations about how group should be doing: from the past, or relative to  some other group Represent the ideal situation: doing as well as I have in the past, or as good as another  group Social discontent You are displeased about how group is doing, annoyed This leads to prejudice and intergroup conflict, could also lead to protest Feel frustration here (think frustration­aggression hypothesis) Sometimes the target is a scapegoat: when the target isn’t obvious What Determines the Ideal? Temporal Comparisons Over time you are doing well Things are getting better and better Expectation is that if things are going well, they will continue going well When the trend starts reversing, you start to get upset More social discontent ‘up here’ than ‘down here’, because when you are down, you are  not doing well, but expect not to do well This is relative versus absolute deprivation Intergroup Comparisons Why is this university ranked higher than mine? If you are anything besides the dominant group, you wonder why your group isn’t doing  as well In SI theory, we wi
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 3CD3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit