Class Notes (838,375)
Canada (510,867)
Brock University (12,137)
Lecture 10

Lecture 10 (March 20).docx

9 Pages
51 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Religious Studies
Course
RELIGST 2N03
Professor
Sherry Smith
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 10 (Wednesday, March 20, 2013) – Funerals and Body Disposition  Review ­ Important organ transplant events in USA ­ Competition/shortage for organs ­ Views of nature of the body ­ Lesley Sharp – strategies used in medical context to depersonalize brain dead donors ­ There is an enormous shortage of organs in China (less than 10% who need them get them) ­ This leads to the illegal trade of organs and transplant tourism Transplant tourism = travelling to other countries to get transplants * Don’t need to know stats, just know that kidneys and livers are the most needed in US and Canada ­ There is also a decreased donor pool because of the aging population and increased recipients  ­ Some people may get multiple transplants  * Know the four views of the body ­ Different language is used about organs when we talk about the body Fatema Al Ansari ­ First woman in world to give birth after 5 organ transplant ­ From Qatar ­ Pancreas, liver, stomach, small and large intestine ­ Five years after February 26  2011, she gave birth ­ Just over 6 500 transplants have been recorded worldwide  ­ Some in Europe too, but less transplants (2) Funeral Rites ­ The most significant of the rites of passage in our process from womb to tomb ­ In many cultures funeral focuses on the deceased ­ In US, funerals focus on the survivors ­ Wider community responds by providing sympathy and support for the grieved  1 Lecture 10 (Wednesday, March 20, 2013) – Funerals and Body Disposition  Vanderlyn Pine – Social Functions of Funerals ­ Has addressed that there are four social functions of funerals 1. Acknowledgement and commemoration of death 2. Setting for disposition of body 3. Reorients bereaved 4. Demonstration of reciprocal social and economic social obligations Elements of a Funeral Ritual 1. Deathwatch ­ Also known as a death vigil or a sitting up ­ As someone is dying or close to dying, relatives gather around to show respect for the dying person  and to give support to the dying person’s family ­ May continue for weeks and months 2. Preparation of the deceased ­ This involves various tasks required for disposition of the body ­ Can depend on cremation or burial preference 3. Wake ­ Also known as visitation or calling hours ­ Traditionally, this is held on the night that the death occurs ­ The practice involves laying out the body and watching a wake over it  ­ They do this in case if the person is not dead mainly  ­ Historically, wakes were observed as a safeguard against premature burial  ­ The traditional wake has been transformed to setting aside visitation time for the individual ­ Makes for social interactions which helps with healing with the los 4. Funeral ­ The funeral is a rite of passage for the deceased and the survivors ­ Services are usually held in a mortuary chapel, church, home, or a gravesite ­ The body may be at the funeral or it may not (if so it may be open­casket or closed casket) ­ Funeral services usually include music, eulogies, greetings, funeral sermon, etc. 2 Lecture 10 (Wednesday, March 20, 2013) – Funerals and Body Disposition  Eulogy = honours the life of the individual specifically Sermon = more religious and focuses on death in general  ­ Usually it is held on weekends now 5. Procession ­ Traditionally funerals include this and this is the taking of the body from the site of the funeral to the  place of burial ­ Usually considered an honour for the person who carries the deceased to the final resting place (Paul  bearer) 6. Committal ­ Ceremony held at the burial or crematorium  ­ Held at the funeral sometimes ­ When following ceremony, usually short  7. Disposal of a corpse * This Way Up (Short Animation) Psychosocial Aspects of Last Rites ­ Commemorate life in community ­ Funeral and memorial services allow a framework as they cope with the loss and express grief ­ There are death rites in almost all cultures, which suggest that they serve innate human needs ­ Announcement of death  ▯usually immediate family members first and then everyone else is notified ­ David Sudnow  ▯death announcements usually take place between people in a peer relationship Example  ▯a mother might call the sibling who was closest to the deceased and then they notify  everyone else ­ A similar pattern happens with individuals who were not as close to the decease ­ This process continues until everyone affected by the death is notified ­ Announcements of death take place through notices and obituaries ­ Timing is important  ▯people tend to become upset if they find out too late (i.e. after funeral) ­ Sets apart bereaved  ▯in some societies, signs, symbols, or clothing distinguish the bereaving person  from those who are mourning Example  ▯in the 19  or 20  century, widows wore mourning dresses that were fully covered in black 3 Lecture 10 (Wednesday, March 20, 2013) – Funerals and Body Disposition  ­ Queen Victoria had a huge influence on the fashions of the mid to late 1800s  ▯after the death of her  husband Prince Albert in 1861, she wore black clothing until her own death in 1901 ­ During the Victorian era, a widow wore a mourning dress for approximately 2.5 years ­ But after the 1920s, this stopped although some individuals of Catholic traditions and those of older  generations still may do this  ­ Today, few people wear black clothing during bereavement ­ Wearing a mourning dress did provide protection for the bereaved because other people understood  that it was a time of distress for the individual  ­ Expectations and demands were lowered at that time and even a stranger could see that a person was  not at their fully best ­ Full mourning lasted about a year, a woman in full mourning wore a veil to cover her face and she  didn’t go to balls or anything frivolous  ­ After a period of a year, a widow added jewelry and simple embellishments and eventually slowly  started to add colour back into their clothing ­ Mutual support  ▯social gatherings at home of bereaved or funeral ­ Announcement, support and other rituals are social interactions aimed to realize loss ­ Funeral offers opportunities for expressions of grief  Example  ▯funerary artifacts  ­ Putting objects that are significant to the deceased and survivors in the casket  ­ Funerary artifacts are manufactured objects and personal affects The Rise of Funeral Services ­ Disposition of the death was a simple human task ­ “Undertaker” from merchant to funeral director ­ As time progressed, the undertaker had a stronger role in providing services  ­ He began to take part of the disposition of the dead and the transporting of the dead for the funeral  and burial  ­ Movement from “mom and pop” type funeral homes to multinational corporations today New Directions ­ There are more options  4 Lecture 10 (Wednesday, March 20, 2013) – Funerals and Body Disposition  ­ Personalized meaning  ▯life­centered funerals Example  ▯instead of a eulogy sermon, eulogies are now often spoken by family members and friends ­ These are called life­centered funerals, there is a less focus on religion ­ Do­it­yourself orientation towards last rites, which have been described as 1. Family directed funerals ­ The family has more control 2. Natural funerals ­ Burials that embrace the natural cycle of life ­ Environmentally­sustainable ­ Death midwife or thana doula Thana doula = Greek term that translates to death servant  ­ Help people deal with death  3. Home funerals ­ Involves the family and social community in the care of the body for burial and in carrying out rituals  and ceremonies  ­ Different from institutional funerals because of its non­invasive care and preparation of body and the  reliance of family social networks for support Home Funerals Grow As Americans Ski
More Less

Related notes for RELIGST 2N03

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit