Class Notes (835,295)
Canada (509,074)
Brock University (12,083)
Lecture 12

Lecture 12 (April 3).docx

10 Pages
52 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Religious Studies
Course
RELIGST 2N03
Professor
Sherry Smith
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 12 (Wednesday, April 3, 2013) – Death as a Spectacle Review ­ Cemeteries ­ Greek for “resting place” ­ Land set aside for burial ­ Changed from church cemetery to larger memorial parks ­ People memorialized through grave markers, plaques, etc. ­ Memorialization/memorials ­ From Taj Mahal to postage stamps ­ Can be personal or keep sake ­ Used to keep memories alive ­ Death and photography ­ Another type of memorial ­ Victorian custom that is still important today, especially for babies ­ These are a way to cope with the loss ­ A means to mourn and memorialize photos was often taken of dead children and they were often  posed ­ A little girl sitting with her dolls ­ Remembrance photography ­ New memorial choices include ­ Virtual cemeteries and virtual memorial gardens ­ People can post their condolences online  ­ This can enhance relationships with the dead ­ Can deepen connection of others who have suffered a loss ­ Cremation jewelry  ▯ashes used to make it  ­ People make t­shirts ­ Spontaneous shrines ­ Emerged to mourn those who have died a sudden death  ­ Also acknowledges the circumstances of death ­ These invited participation of others 1 Lecture 12 (Wednesday, April 3, 2013) – Death as a Spectacle ­ They are performative commemorations  ­ They are performative because they address social issues Example  ▯gun control (Newtown massacre and Aurora shootings) ­ Road side memorials mark a bad death ­ These are not a new phenomenon but have only been common in North America in the lat 15 years Death as Spectacle Spectacle = memorable event ­ “Specially prepared” or “arranged display” Spectaculum = “a show” Spectare = “to see,” “to view” or “to watch” ­ We can think of TV programming as death as a spectacle  ­ Donald Kyle  ▯“The death of humans usually constitutes a spectacle, a disturbing sight which is awful  in both senses of the word, an eerie yet intriguing phenomenon demanding acknowledgement and  attention.” Example  ▯gladiators ­ Ancient Romans saw bloodshed as entertainment ­ Gladiatorial combat was part of a wealthy citizen’s funeral ceremonies to symbolize human struggles  of death ­ But later to be just general ­ These were looked forward to among all statuses/citizens Example  ▯death as sport  ­ Common occurrence ­ All classes attended and accepted the games Example  ▯gladiator combats, ritualized executions, animal hunts ­ These were entertaining ­ Punishing people  ▯serving an example to other citizens ­ Promoting interactions between the emperor and the ruled and even providing meal rations to the  Roman citizens ­ Bloodshed as spectacle served a purposeful use in society  2 Lecture 12 (Wednesday, April 3, 2013) – Death as a Spectacle Pollice Verso ­ Translates to “with a turned thumb” ­ An 1872 painting by Jean­Leon Gerome Faithful Unto Death Christianae ad Leones = Christians to the lions ­ By Herbert Gustave Schmalz ­ 1888 African American Lynching ­ Lynching photos were mass­produced as postcards throughout the U.S. ­ Isaac McGhie, Elmer Jackson, and Elias Clayton  ­ On June 15, 1920, when three black circus workers were attacked and lynched by a mob in Duluth,  Minnesota ­ Rumors had circulated among that six African Americans had raped a teenage girl ­ A physician’s examination subsequently found no evidence of rape or assault Cockfight in London, Ca. 1808 ­ DAS also includes animals ­ Dog fighting is illegal in most countries ­ Used as entertainment, but also a way to make money/gamble th ­ In Europe and North America before the 19  century, bear bating/bull bating and cockfights were  prevalent  ­ Bulls were attacked by dogs to tenderize the meat and entertainment ­ Bear versus dog were also entertainment Pet Cemeteries  ­ Many are now memorializing pets 3 Lecture 12 (Wednesday, April 3, 2013) – Death as a Spectacle ­ Either using professionals or doing it themselves in some way ­ At Huffman Taxidermy in Aguilar, pets like this Pomeranian are preserved for their owners by Vicky  Huffman and her family ­ According to statistics, 35.5% houses owned a dog, which are almost 40 million dogs and 30.4%  houses owned a cat, which are almost 36 million cats ­ In 2009, finances spent on animals  ▯$4 billion  ­ This is to enhance the well­being of cats and dogs ­ Animals have been made into a marketplace  ­ They are being treated more like humans ­ It is a feeling on kinship to explain why people put so much time and money into them ­ Pets are now being part of obituaries as well Leona Helmsley and Trouble ­ She left her dog $12 million ­ She wanted to be buried with her dog, but this didn’t happen because of laws ­ Humans can be buried in pet cemeteries but not the other way around  ­ There are now many pet cemeteries ­ Found in 70s and 80s in U.S. and Canada ­ Prior to the late 19  century, most urban pets were thrown in garbage or meat plants ­ Then, places to dispose of animals were developed ­ The first pet cemetery was founded in 1896 in Hartsdale, NY ­ Wide variety on animals ­ Mostly dogs and cats ­ There was a lion cub buried there too ­ The grave markers show how much animals meant to people ­ There’s even a mausoleum ­ They have regular dogs, but even war dogs who died in war ­ Animal cemeteries look like human ones  Stanley Brandes: “The Meaning of American Pet Cemetery Gravestones” (2009) 4 Lecture 12 (Wednesday, April 3, 2013) – Death as a Spectacle ­ He conducted a study on American pet gravestone, going back 100 years ­ Many people come visit animals as family members/companions ­ Gravestone inscriptions developments 1. Naming patterns ­ Pre WWII  ▯did not have names ­ Early pet names did not include gender ­ After WWII, the number of human names given to dogs increased, which revealed gender ­ This gave them a more distinctive identity ­ 1930s  ▯photographs on tombstones 2. Kinship and family ties ­ Being seen as kin ­ Some early pet inscriptions showed they were seen as friends or beloved ­ After WWII  ▯80s, pets were referred to as part of the family, shown on graves  ­ Animals are given surnames during this period ­ This symbolically converts them into blood relatives ­ Many pets are considered children ­ Since the 80s, gravestones give fuller picture of the pets on their graves ­ They have religious and ethnic identity, surnames, and other features that parallel them with human  children  3. Religious and ethnic identity ­ Enhanced religious and ethnic identity since the 1980s ­ The inclusion of religious sediments ­ They also have obtained a spiritual identity, which implies life after death Example  ▯crosses, stars of David, inscription may say “until we meet again,” etc. ­ People place pebbles on monuments ­ Given surname shows ethnic identity given to the pet  Gunther von Hagens ­ Medically trained German animist 5 Lecture 12 (Wednesday, April 3, 2013) – Death as a Spectacle ­ Creator of Body Worlds ­ Body Worlds is an example of plastinated bodies ­ Developed plastination in 1978  Plastination = process of doing something with the skin so they can be moved around and placed
More Less

Related notes for RELIGST 2N03

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit