Class Notes (836,517)
Canada (509,851)
CLST 330 (15)
Lecture

CLST 330 - Feb. 6th.docx

5 Pages
104 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Classical Studies
Course
CLST 330
Professor
Fabio Colivicchi
Semester
Winter

Description
CLST 330  ­ Feb 6th Public and Private – The oikos in Greek Society: Oikos: household – the persons who make up the family Including servants, possessions (land, houses, objects, animals, etc.) – the place where they live The basic cell of Greek society, the smallest unit for reproduction of the group Also the basic economic unit and smallest group to perform cults  Structure of the Oikos: Kourios – master, person in authority ▯ Wife – can leave the oikos in case of divorce or in some cases death of the husband ▯ Minor sons – leave the oikos when they come of age ▯ Unmarried daughters – leave the oikos when they get married Birth and Childhood in Classical Athens: Both parents had to be proper citizens for a child to be granted citizenship  Becoming an Athenian Citizen: Naming ceremony (dekate – the tenth day) – before witnesses Enrolment of the son in the father’s phratry – hereditary association – during the festival of  Apatouria after the approval of its members Brotherhood, kinfolk – social division of Greek tribe  Daughters could be presented, but were not enrolled  Enrolment of the son in the father’s deme when he was 18, and scrutiny before the council of the  500  These two actions were necessary for the sons to have full citizen rights once they became adults In the case of contested admission, the witnesses of the dekate, the father, and the mother had to  swear an oath as evidence The facts that the wedding was properly publicized, that there were witnesses at the naming  ceremony, and that the enrolment in the phratry and the deme was uncontested was also  considered proof of legitimacy  Children of two regularly married parents were legitimate, all others were illegitimate  A law of Perikles passed in 451/50 BC required that both parents be citizens for a child to be a  citizen It is not clear if illegitimate songs of citizen parents qualified for citizenship For sure their right to admission to hereditary groups and inheritance was restricted, and this  affected their citizenship Besides active participation in political and judicial life, citizenship also meant the right to own land  and houses in Attica  Children in Greek Art: th Children are not a major subject in Greek art until 5  century BC When represented, thy look like smaller scale adults Starting from the 5  century BC, representation so children are more realistic  In Hellenistic art, images of children would be a very popular subject In colour figures, their skin is frequently white Athens, funerary stele of the children of Megakles – 530 BC Lots of women and their children in art – vases, flasks, gravestones, etc.  Men entering a symposium and boy playing the pipes Children and burial customs: Children under the age of 3 are usually buried differently from adults  Usually inhumated, frequently in reused amphorae (enchytrismos) E.g. Burial of a child inside a reused terracotta pipe from Athens Sometimes buried in specialized ceremonies, or even near the houses From physical to social birth – male transition rites  Rites of passage: According to anthropologist Arnold van Gennep (who studied French folk culture), they have three  phases: 1. Separation (preliminaire) In regards to mythology, Ephebes put through period of isolation between 17­18 2. Liminality (liminaire) A threshold – middle stage of ritual Time of ambiguity  Would need to hunt, rely on senses, aggression, stealth, and trickery to survive  Middle of ritual  3. Incorporation (postliminaire) Brought back to society  At the end of initiation, the ephebe was reincorporated back into society as a man  If community was ever threatened, its men would have necessary skills to protect it The Anthesteria and the passage rituals of the children In honour of Dionysus First day – jar­opening (pithoigia) At the beginnings of the new vintage The first grapes from the vineyeard in the countryside are offered At sunset, the sanctuary is open and the jars are carried in  Second day – the wine­jugs (cheos) Tasting of new wine, drinking contest The children are allowed to taste their first jug of wine This is also a day when the doors of the houses are painted black and people chew buckhorn  leaves to keep away ghosts The other sanctuaries are closed and oaths are not allowed – stops all business that required oaths Third day – the pots (c
More Less

Related notes for CLST 330

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit