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SOC 300 - Notes - First Nations Society - Jan 29.docx

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Department
Sociology
Course
SOC 300
Professor
K.T.
Semester
Winter

Description
SOC 300 – Sociology of Diversity Tuesday, January 29, 2013: First Nations Society  Pre-contact  Foundation of the mainstream worldview A) Religious creation story B) Scientific creation story C) Migration theories  Philosophy and Governance A) Enlightenment B) Thomas Hobbes C) John Locke’s theory of land ownership  First Nations philosophy A) Oral tradition B) Creation stories C) Concepts of land and spirituality D) Community organization E) International organization 1)) First READING: society prior to contact by the Europeans and the Aboriginals  Conflicting and contracting  Differing values and perspective between the two societies 2)) Worldview are a set of assumption, values, beliefs that shape their foundation in which one comprehends and understands the world- in particular, society  Shapes the way we live, how we act, our political actions A) Mainstream = Eurocentric/ Christian  New Testament was created during the agricultural era  Created to reflect the values of this time - Human was set upon the earth to procreate (reflection for the rate of death by labor and the need of children for labor) - Own/monopolize/protect the land - Slaves were necessary – to dominate and steal their wealth to take as your own - Concept of justice was very specific and rooted in religious ideologies (even to this day, laws reflect Christianity – “eye for an eye” and this is reflected through monetary value)  God created men in his image - Gendered and radicalized - MEN were the only one to possess a spirit and thus the domination over animals and land – It is their God given right to do whatever they wanted to animals and nature (as well as women and children as exemplified by the marriage ceremony that passes woman from her father’s possession to her husband) - Prostatizing of religion which meant those who failed to convert to Christianity meant death Katie T. Szeto  On the other hand, Aboriginals did not try to manipulate Mother Nature, rather, they waited for Mother Nature to provide for them. They did not cultivate land but rather communities.  Focused on not over-taxing Mother Nature - Procreation was only done when needed - Did not conceptualize the ownership of land, you cannot own Mother Nature and her resources B) SCIENTIFIC 1800’s, science is now used to reason and legitimize the doimination of nature, resources, land, and other humans.  Darwinism: o Started in South Africa (legitimized that those still in South Africa was inferior to the European race because they were not the perfected form) o Used to support Capitialism and realtions of production o Used to support dominance of the upper class C) MIGRATION There are four theories on how people came to settle in America: 1. Arrived America through a land bridge from Siberia and Alaska 2. Came through the sea by traveling through Pacific and moving along the coast (Pacific Route Theory) 3. Early migration by the sea through Atlantic (pre-Vikings) 4. “American Genesis” – a bring new generation line that occurred in the Americans (that is, the Americas were always populated and had actually migrated to Asia) All four theories have something in common: everyone is an immigrant to the land 3))  The beginning of the industrial revolution  A very violent time, where people are either hogging everything or starving to death  Monarch are sending their people to kill and conquer  The plague is killing millions at a time A&B) ENLIGHTMENT & THOMAS HOBBES  writing in the 1660 (The Leviathans)  Defended the monarchy (human were not very rational beings) whereas the other three known Englightest disagreed (Locke /Mills / Rousse – humans lived in a state of nature)  The real state of nature for man is to kill everyone, that is why he argued for the government and nor cou
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