Class Notes (838,541)
Canada (510,933)
SA 150 (166)
Lecture 5

Week 5 – Globalization and Work.docx
Premium

8 Pages
129 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology and Anthropology
Course
SA 150
Professor
Amie Mc Lean
Semester
Spring

Description
Week 5 – Globalization and Work 01/20/2014 Mon Feb 18. 9am­11am Stability and Social Cohesion Remembering serial killers/ reaffirms social values and cohesion; brings people together over outrage/  mourning of those killed/ what is considered right/wrong  Social dysfunction : any social pattern that may disrupt the operation of society  Potential to undermine trust authorities ­ police – report filed that were ignored Non–remembrance of victims can cause less social cohesions through fams not feeling like their family  member wasn’t important enough to remember  Social Conflict Theory ­ Power, inequality, and conflict  First nations and reserves  These theorists look through history for underlining factors that created this situation  Aboriginal women are still the most victimized of abuse 582 missing/murdered girls in Canada – inadequate  police response due to colonialism – discriminations/ denial of their traditions  Can also look at male domination­ sexual exploitation in our culture – theorists might argue we remember  the men b/c they have more power – killers in extreme cases  ­ Capitalism – cults of serial killers­ fan clubs around them  ^all of these things undermine social cohesion  Symbolic Interactionism  ­Takes a micro­level orientation ­Interactions and social meanings   ^  how social meanings get carried into our reactions/actions on a daily basis –ex. how crimes may affect  how we dress if we go out downtown; reluctant to go out or walk alone in certain areas; can be related to  not wanting to be blamed for it if anything happens – not to be viewed through society as “asking for it”.  The Economy: Economy: the social institutions that organizes a society production, distribution, and consumption of  goods and services  Capitalism: economic system where natural resources and means of production are privately owned.  Private ownership  – individs can own pretty much anything  Profit Motive   ­ongoing push/ drive to create profit/ accumulate wealth – interest in individual goals  Neoliberalism  – imp role in influencing economy and work – “laisse faire” motto – “leave it alone” – gov’t  interference in market place will cause problems – everything should just be regulated by supply and  demand = best way –works for minor things, but becomes complicated when dealing with more complex  things – when it literally means the diff between life and death – does supply and demand still prove to  work?  Canadian economy is capitalist but also has some socialist aspects.  Socialism: economic system where natural resources and means of producing goods are collectively  owned  Collective ownership  – land that isn’t owned privately – owned by gov’t and distributed for good of  Canadians  Collective goals  ­ ­ linking good of individual w good of society – individual goals + society goals  together  Communism­ Karl Marx – ownership of means of production + workers was collectively owned and  workers would not be exploited – has never actually existed – is hypothetical  Welfare Capitalism: Combines a mostly market­based economy with extensive social welfare  programs  collective ownership of key industries  (health care/ transportation/ sometimes media) regulation of industry  (environmental legislation etc.) high taxation  (causes high levels of social services)  high levels of social services  (post sec ed. Free to residence, free medical ) ­ also high rate of membership in unions  Health care:  – Economy and social justice – paid for through taxation/ universally available for those in welfare  capitalism societies –  ­ Canadian gov’t pays HALF of what us pays for citizens  ­ Health care reforms in states have been heavily controversial  Understand basic diff’s between these 3  Capitalism  – supply/demand – individual freedom
More Less

Related notes for SA 150

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit