Class Notes (835,426)
Canada (509,186)
BIOL495 (4)
Lecture

Macroecology

7 Pages
65 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology (Biological Sciences)
Course
BIOL495
Professor
Lien Luong
Semester
Winter

Description
Macro­ecology: global patterns and effect of climate change on disease BIOL 495 Victory Obiefuna January 29, 2014 Discussion • “The ecology of climate change and infectious diseases” (2009). Review article.  o Introduction  Infectious diseases transmit better when the climate is warmer.   Climate change (making places warmer) might make it easier for  things like malaria to be transmitted in traditionally colder climates  like England’s.  Climate change  ▯expansion of tropical diseases’ ranges. Mosquito  and tick born tropical diseases in particular.   Aims of the review article • Introduce how temperature drives important biological  processes.  • Consider how climate might affect spatial (latitude and  altitude) and temporal (seasonal, interannual, historical)  patterns in disease.  • Figure out whether climate change has affected infectious  disease.  • Review models that project how climate change might  affect infectious diseases in the future.  o Thermal physiology   Some parasites prefer cooler temperatures, because their  environmentally resistant stages are cannot deal with extended  exposures to warmer temperatures   Range limits for parasites are affected by the increase in  temperatures through out the world. Eg: since Sweden is warming  up, the range of tick­borne encephalitis is increasing.   The exact effects depend on a number of variables within the  complex system that governs transmission and stuff o Evidence for effects of climate in infectious diseases  Spatial patterns • Tropical regions  ▯higher species diversity • Diversity of infectious diseases is higher in countries that  are closer to the equator • High diversity of infectious diseases in the tropics could be  related to the diversity of the vectors in the region.  o Lots of infectious diseases have a specific vector.  So, if you live in a temperate zone, the vector will  not be around  ▯you will not become infected • altitude is also related to infectious disease prevalence.  Malaria is more common in lower altitudes than in higher  altitudes, because the cold that comes with the higher  altitudes makes it difficult for the mosquitos to develop  properly. • GDP and wealth of nations may also affect the rate of  transmission (think: control measures being put in place  and stuff of that sort) • Restriction of malaria to the tropics suggests that climate is  really important when it comes to the range of an infectious  disease  • Malarious countries have GDPs one fifth that of non­ malarious contries. Suggesting that economic forces,  particularly environmental destruction, have pushed  malaria out of temperate regions o This makes sense. More industrialized regions have  less of the natural environments that would promote  the survival of vectors and other things of that sort.   Seasonality • There are seasonal patterns in malaria.  • Since temperature and precipitation change as seasons  change, climate change will affect infectious diseases that  are seasonal  • Eg: Black spot (fish trematode metacercariae) is more  common in salmon when it is warm.  • Endemic cholera is more common when the water  temperatures are higher.  • Some infectious diseases have declines when the  temperature is warmer and the weather is wetter. Specific  examples are referred to in the paper there.  • Seasonality is not necessarily related to the effects of  climate on disease. Has more to do with the lengths of  days, which is important for biological processes.  Climate change does not affect day length • Time lags between climate and species abundances create  statistical challenges for investigating seasonal effects on  infectious disease.  o Conditions that make it easier for mosquito larvae  to develop do not necessarily enhance disease  transmission  Interannual variation • Epidemics can vary from year to year.  • Epidemics have been linked to the strong interannual  variation in weather associated with the Southern  Oscillation (El Nino) o Malaria cases increase after El Nino.  • Interannual associations with disease relate to precipitation o For aquatic vectors, more rain makes transmission  much easier o More rain  ▯mosquito larvae develop better  ▯more  malaria cases • This is not a simple relationship though. There are way  more things that have an effect.   History  • Historical records  of disease can provide long time series  for investigating interannual associations between climate  and disease.  • The yellow fever epidemic that hit the US in 1878  happened after a large El Nino event.  o More precipitation  ▯more reproduction of the  yellow fever vector Aedes aegypti  ▯more chance of  transmission of the virus  • To be able to fully link El Nino to the yellow fever  epidemic, you have to look at the years around that year to  see what was  happening. o Found the most deadly yellow fever epidemics were  more likely to follow an El Nino event.  o El Nino did not explain everything though o Other factors = accumulation of susceptible hosts  during the non­epidemic years, accumulation of  enough susceptibles for an epidemic after 3 years.   How would you be able to know that for  sure, though? How did the research that  was being reviewed determine that there  were other things that were causing this  outbreak?  • Malaria in England: history o Common during the medieval warm period (1200) o Outbreaks corresponded with unusually warm  weather o Declines in malaria deaths correspond to land­use  changes more than to climate  Again, how were they able to determine  this? o Ironically, when malaria was declining, the climate  was getting warmer and wetter.  o Decrease in malaria was related to an increase in  wetland destruction  Experiments • Use of experiments = to investigate the effects of climate  variables on vital rates of some infectious diseases and their  vectors • Eg: Schistosomiasis. Research has been done to look at the  rate at which cercariae shedding from snails changes with  the changes in temperatures.  • “Changes in temperature” experiments have been done to  determine whether or not temperature change will affect a  parasite’s ability to cause disease in the host. • Experiment work suggests that climate may directly affect  influenza epidemic rates.  o Dry and cold environments favour the transmission  of the flu virus. 
More Less

Related notes for BIOL495

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit