Class Notes (838,194)
Canada (510,747)
Psychology (1,195)
PSYCO341 (16)
Lecture

chapter 13 Morality.docx

3 Pages
93 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCO341
Professor
Taka Masuda
Semester
Winter

Description
Defining Morality and Moral Judgment • Morality ­ system of principles and ideals that people use as an obligatory guide to making evaluative  judgments of the actions or character of a person • Three Components of Morality 1. Obligation: The rule is supposed to be followed 2. Inclusion: Rules should apply to all people 3. Sanction: Punishment for violations and praise for adherence to moral standards The Morality of Thoughts What Domains Does Morality Extend to?   • In all cultures people view some behaviors as being more moral than others.  Nowhere is it acceptable to  harm others without cause. • But is it a moral failing if one has undesirable thoughts? (I.e. just thinking bad things!) Jewish vs. Christian Worldviews • The New Testament (i.e., the Christian half of the bible) explicitly discusses private thoughts as moral  domains. It specifies how one is not saved until one has appropriate beliefs. • Further, it discusses how impure thoughts themselves are sins. • In contrast, the Old Testament (aka, the Hebrew Bible) has little to say about beliefs(thoughts) ­ mostly it  is about behaviors. For example, 8 of the 10 commandments are about behaviors, and the remaining 2  (honoring one’s parents when they are old and not coveting anything of your neighbor’s) appear to be  interpreted differently by Jews and Christians. • Judaism emphasizes a wider variety of behaviors, such as keeping kosher, than does Christianity. Will Jews and Christians View People with Impure Thoughts Differently? • Study compared Jews and Protestants in how they responded to various vignettes where someone thinks  about inappropriate things. • Results: When participants were asked if it was immoral if Mr. B actually had the affair there were no  differences between Jews and Protestants ­ both agreed equally that this would be immoral behavior. • However, Protestants viewed Mr. B more negatively than did Jews for just thinking about having an affair. • Protestants are also more likely than Jews to believe that thoughts are under one’s control. • Protestants also view thoughts as being more likely to lead to behaviors than do Jews. Justice: What is Fair? • People’s views of what is just and fair are evident in how they go about deciding how to distribute  resources (i.e. give someone 1$ while other 10$=injustice) • There are 3 key principles that underlie how people distribute resources. • Principle of Equality: Everyone gets the same amount, irrespective of contributions. (Example ­ gov’t  issues identical rebate cheques to every citizen). • Principle of Equity: People get an amount based on what they have contributed. (Example ­ A salesperson  may earn her salary based on commission). • Principle of Need: People get an amount based on the degree of their needs. (Example ­ universal health  care.  The sick get more benefits than the healthy). •  Meritocracy:   North American a lot. It leads to competition a lot.  • There is variation in the nation in which of the above principal is used. Asian  equity ( olders get more) and  the need ( give beggars money) Culture and Justice • Study contrasted Americans and Indians. Participants were asked to imagine in a vignette how a company  might best distribute money for a bonus between two employees. • One employee was a very effective worker, whereas the other employee did not contribute so much.   However, the latter employee was in a poor financial situation because of an illness in the family. • They were testing which of the three principal they are going to use in this situations. Allocation Principles • The most popular principle for Indians was need.  This was the least popular principle for Americans. • Americans preferred the principle of equity closely followed by equality.  Equity was the least popular  solution among Indians.   • MP: Perceptions of fairness vary across cultures. Why these results: • Perceptions of fairness have been key to understanding how cooperative norms emerge in human societies. • There are only 2 ways that cooperation are understood strictly in terms of biological evolution. 1. Kin selection.  It is adaptive (i.e., you have more surviving o
More Less

Related notes for PSYCO341

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit