Class Notes (837,836)
Canada (510,504)
Psychology (1,195)
PSYCO341 (16)
Lecture

chapter 9 notes.docx

2 Pages
72 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCO341
Professor
Taka Masuda
Semester
Winter

Description
Groups • The kinds of relationships that people have are also evident in the groups to which they belong. • People with independent and interdependent selves also tend to view ingroups and outgroup differently. • Although everyone has closer and somewhat different kinds of relationships with ingroups and outgroups,  the distinction between them is of more concern for people with interdependent selves . Two Models of Ingroup Identity • Westerners appear to base their group identity by The shared Features that they possess.  (Entity Model of   Ingroup Identity) • In contrast, East Asian groups appear to base their group identity more on Common Connections that they  might have I Network Model of Ingroup Identity) • For example, The blue person IS an ingroup member, because they are bonded by connections to a other  people  people. Everyone connected are an ingroup. Study: • American and Japanese participants played an economic trust game on the computer, which involved them  having to decide whether to trust their opponent to give them a fair share of money. • They were told that their opponent was from one of the following 3 conditions. • Their opponent was from their own university. • Their opponent was from another university, at which the participant did not have any acquaintances. • Their opponent was from another university, at which the participant had at least one acquaintance. • The dependent variable was the amount of trust that participants showed towards their opponent. • Results: Japanese showed greater trust for the out­group member when they had an acquaintance from that  other university.  They could apparently imagine ways in which there might be a chain of relationships that  connects them. ( just like the blue guy example above. If you a connection, even if it is an imagined one ▯ you are considered an ingroup.) Culture and Friendship Formation • Canadian participants and Japanese participants were asked to describe their experience of seeking help  from close­same sex friend in an open ended questionnaire • Instrumental Help: Do me a favor • Emotional Help: Giving or receiving nurturance. • Informational Help: Giving or receiving help in understanding problems or reducing ambiguity • Shared Activity: eg: Ask the friend to come with you when appealing a grade. • Results: Overall both Canadian and Japanese participants reported tangible instrumental help more  frequently than the other types of help.  Canadian a lot more through • Compared to Canadian participants, Japanese participants were less inclined to seek help that directly  removed their personal problems but more inclined to seek help that indirectly aided them to deal with their  personal problems by themselves  ( want to solve their own probems mostly themselves but would still  appreciate  an aid) Resultant Intimacy Expectations as a Function of Perceived Cost in Study 1 • Japanese participants reported lower intimacy expectations in their friendship as the help became more  costly to their friend • Canadian participants assumed moderately higher intimacy levels as the help were perceived to be more  costly. Social Support: European­Americans are far more likely than East Asians or Asian Americans to actively seek  social support from others. East Asians indeed depend on social support from close others. But, they are more  likely than Westerners to rely on implicit social support. Are Friendships Only Positive? • Poem is from Ghana, an interdependent culture. Which show different both positive and negatives of  having friends. • Wh
More Less

Related notes for PSYCO341

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit