Class Notes (836,580)
Canada (509,856)
History (1,252)
HIST 2600 (61)
Lecture

HIST 2600 January 27 2014 Lecture VII.docx

6 Pages
109 Views
Unlock Document

Department
History
Course
HIST 2600
Professor
Rebecca Beausaert
Semester
Winter

Description
HIST 2600 January 27 2014 Lecture VII­ Social and Moral  Reform Why moral or social reform movement emerged ­ So far we have looked, urbanization, immigration, industrialization ­ Early 19  and early 20  century (1880­ first world war) o Called a transitional age  Profound changes across Canada in a variety of aspects • Social composition • Politics • Culture • Economy • Religion • Also happening in USA and Britain (similarities between  three countries) o In Canada specifically:  Canadians not adapting very well to the  rapid changed happening • “Growing pains” • Canadian society falling apart and  breaking down in late 19  century  • Concern about social welfare and  state of Canadian society  • Efforts to reform society o Ideal ways of living and of  behavior o Trying to solve the so called  break down in society  Called the  REFORM  MOVEMENT  Individuals trying to purify and regenerate  Canadian society   Individuals and family dynamics as well   Concerned about Canada’s future prosperity:  want to build a healthy and strong nation  These reforms zero in on the least desirable  changes   Individuals doing it because a lot fo the  problems are out of the governments control • The government cant change ­ Historically the church would have stepped in  o But the problems facing Canadian society are to widespread and vast so  the church don’t have the control or ability to do it all 1  Thus individuals and formed groups are stepping up to solve these  problems  In some ways the government is stepping ­ Social issues: middle class Canadians are the ones most paying attention o They have the time and money to do it o Upper class stays out of it more Major concerns of reforms in urban Canada ­ Housing o Poor housing (working class housing) ­ Working conditions: low wages, poor conditions, children in the work force o Fewer children receiving an education ­ Poverty o Canadian urban centers specifically ­ Hygiene: ­ Off shot of all of these concerns: o More and more Canadians aren’t attending church   Huge concern for social reforms th  Part of th  century sthiety (very important)  Later 19  to early 20  century fewer and fewer people attending  church   Social reforms complain that fewer people are abiding by biblical  practices and morals  Complaining that Canadians are spending time working and  pursuing leisure and other pleasures  ­ “Social Gospel” o Used religious teaching and spiritual activity to promote social change o Believed people were born good and bad behavior was caused by the  environment in which they lived o Improving social conditions would create a more moral and religious  society  o J. S. Wooodsworht: famous advocate of Social Gospel  o Methodist from Winnipeg o Concerned with urban slums and immigration  Wrote “Strangers Within Our Gates”  Complaining about Canada’s “open door” policies  Immigrants should adapt more quickly to Canadian society • Immigrants are causing the problem, need to assimilate  faster • “All Peoples Mission” o Religious reform group set up to help poor  immigrants to assimilate to) Canadian society (he  was the head of? Or part of?  Many of these advocates of social gospel are women because: 2 • Women viewed as really maternal beings (taking care of  people) thus natural for them to use these “natural  instincts” to help others • “Hobbies” for these middle class women • Women are the caretakers of the home and family o Natural to oversee these social works o Inherently good beings  • Also a way to exert a more active role in society o Becoming more pubic, vocal and political  o Most of these social reformers are concerned with conditions in local  centers but some penetrate small towns and rural areas  Urban centers: the way that cities are planned and ways that they  looked are to blame for these social problems • The city beautiful movement emerges  o Essentially a call for municipal governments to pay  attention to the implementation of social programs,  new facilities, street and transportation planning,  and “beautification” (green spaces, parks etc.)  • A lot of the plans were very ambitious and time consuming  (look at photo at the end, Calgary: city beautiful movement  1913 “attempt”, does not look like that) o Settlement houses are introduced: provide the less fortunate basic  necessities like food and shelters  • Some offered medical care, education (night schools),  recreational facilities (gym), and/or libraries etc. 
More Less

Related notes for HIST 2600

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit