Class Notes (836,126)
Canada (509,644)
HTM 2700 (226)
Val Allen (36)
Lecture 2

Week 2.docx

5 Pages
111 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Hospitality and Tourism Management
Course
HTM 2700
Professor
Val Allen
Semester
Fall

Description
Week 2: Cooked/ Bojac Dressing:  ­ Contents: eggs, starch, water, vinegar and dry mustard ­ Dispersed phase= eggs, starch and dry mustard ­ Continuous phase= water and vinegar This is a solid/ liquid dispersion system Dispersion System: Emulsions:  ­ Special sub­group of liquid/liquid dispersion system ­ Must always contain 2 immiscible liquids (ex of immiscible liquids: oil and  vinegar: two ingredients that will not mix together)  ­ Not capable of staying mixed together  ­ One immiscible liquid is dispersed in the other immiscible liquid  ­ 2 types: temporary, permanent Temporary Emulsion: ­ Ex) vinaigrette dressings (oil, vinegar and seasonings) ­ Oil is temporarily dispersed in vinegar ­ The 2 immiscible liquids separate upon standing Permanent Emulsion:  ­ Ex) Mayonnaise ­ Contains an Emulsifier ­ Emulsifiers keep one immiscible liquid dispersed in another immiscible liquid  permanently  ­ In mayonnaise, oil is dispersed phase and vinegar is continuous phase ­ Egg yolk contains emulsifier LECITHIN  Emulsifier ­ Has an affinity for both phases of an emulsion  ­ Most common emulsifier is LECTHIN in egg yolks ­ Has a hydrophilic end and hydrophobic end  ­ HYDRO= water ­ PHOBIC= fear of ­ PHILIC= loving/liking Fruit:  Cell Wall is composed of:  1) Cellulose:  ­ Main constituent ­ Deposited in fibers ­ Complex carbohydrates which is a polymer of glucose ­ Source of fiber in the diet­ Beta linkage cannot be broken down by humans 2) Hemicellulose:  ­ Cellulose is embedded in hemicellulose ­ Complex carbohydrates which is a polymer of xylose ­ *Breaks down in alkaline conditions (will be a factor when talking about veggies)  Effect of Cooking on Cellulose and Hemicellulose: ­ Heat and water together cause softening  ­ Texture changes from: hard/ firm/ crisp to softer/ less firm/ less crisp ­ Cellulose and hemicellulose becomes softer (do NOT break down) ­ Acid slows down softening process, allowing fruits/ vegetable to retain firmness  longer ­ Alkaline condition cause hemicellulose ONLY to break down ­ Results in mushy, slimy vegetables ­ There is an alkaline pH=8.0 in the Guelph area 3) Pectic Substances: ­ Complex carbohydrates which are polymers of galacturonic acid ­ Also found in the spaces between cells= INTERCELLULAR SPACES ­ There are 3 pectic substances:  ­ 1) Protopectin: is cement (glue) between cells, allowing a fruit to maintain its  shape. ­ During ripening or cooking of fruit (heat+acid): Protopectin> Pectin> Pectin Acid ­ Called solubilization or protopectin ­ Results in a loss of fruit shape ­ Acid: (added or naturally occurring organic acids), speeds up the rate of  protopectin solubilization  (fruit will lose shape faster)  ­ Sugar: slows down protopectin solubilization by forming hydrogen bonds with  protopectin (fruits retain shape longer) Fruits:  ­ *High proportion of pectic substances ­ Low in cellulose and hemicellulose Vegetables:(Next week) ­*High in cellulos and hemicellulose ­ Low in pectic substances Increase in Translucency during Cooking of Fruits and vegetables ­ Plant Cell ­ Intercellular Spaces: ­ Contains pectic substances and oxygen ­ Oxygen gives raw fruits and vegetables opaque appearance ­ Cooking in a medium containing h2o means some oxygen is replaced ­ Cooking in a medium containing h2o means some oxygen is replaced by water ­ O2 in intercellular spaces = opaque RAW ­ H20 in intercellular spaces= translucent COOKED ­ Refractive index is closer to a value of (l)  Other Parts of the Cell:  Cytoplasm:  ­ Jelly­like substance ­ Enclosed by cell membrane ­ Contains:  ­ 1) PLASTIDS which contain fat soluble pigments (chlorophylls and carotenoids)  and starch ­ 2) NUCLEUS (genetic material)  ­ 3) MITOCHONDRIA (contain enzymes)  Cell Membrane:  ­ Not the same as the cell wall ­ Composed of LIPOPROTEINS (protein­fat complex) ­ In living cells (raw food) cell
More Less

Related notes for HTM 2700

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit