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Lecture

Locke Second Treatsie (PART3).docx

3 Pages
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Department
Philosophy
Course Code
PHIL 1010
Professor
Patricia Sheridan

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Locke's Liberal State > Representation and 'persons' • Landowner's and rights • Who's going to 'sign on' to this program? > Majority Rule > Libertarian Locke or welfare state Locke? • Small government or big government Locke's Two Radical Proposals > Persons are rational, autonomous, equal and free by nature • This presents the basis for liberal individualism • Society is a collection of autonomous individuals seeking the security of central governing bodies • Society is a collection of people > Locke is representation • What does this mean exactly? Representation > The interests and opinions of the citizens are a key factor in making public policy and legislation > Political actors act on behalf of the citizenry • If they fail, in this regard, this is grounds for 'eviction' > This sounds straightforward... > Three issues that arise here: • Individualism as a basis for social organization, idea that society is a sum of collection of individuals • Property and representation • Equality: what role does this play in the state Individualism and Government > Individuals for Locke: • Atomic theory of self • Goods acquirers of goods • Rational agents - Practical reasoning key here • Notions of justice and good based on individuals interests and inhibition of personal freedom • Competitive • 'a state of perfect freedom to order their actions ... as they think fit... without asking leave, or depending on the Will of any other Man' • Limits on freedom must be justified on grounds that such limits secure our individual interests/property • In fact, for Locke, law as a restriction must enhance our freedom to pursue our interests and be safe in our property Problems with this model > Priority of individual over collective goods • Mills harms principle a good example • Government has to pay attention to individuals right, that is freedom freedom to pursue as long as you don't harm others > Is the governments role to ensure goods for everyone, or to ensure the freedom to pursue goods and secure the property of each person? > Is there room on this account for communal or common goods legislation? > "Libertarians believe that being free and independent in a great way to live. We want a system which encourages all people choose what they want from life and which lets them live, love work plat and dream there own way...The libertarian way is a logically consistent approach to politics based on the moral principle of self-ownership. Eac
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