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Criminology- Oct 4.docx

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Department
Criminology
Course
CRM1301
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Fall

Description
Criminology Oct 4Classical vs Positivist Criminology 1764ClassicalThey are criminologist but there is no criminology back in that timeClassicalemerges when the time and theories are dying Intelligence and rationality are fundamental characteristics of humans Each and every one of us has free willSociety comes together when they think it is rational Crime then is a product of free choice individuals you think you know whats best for you Weigh the benefits of committing a crimeWhen the benefit of the crime outweighs the cost of crime you will commit crime If the cost is greater than the benefit of committing crime than I wont do it Classical TheoristBeccaria and Bentham You want to make the cost greater than the benefitPositivist thMid 19 centuryBehaviour is a product that is beyond the control of an individualYou dont have free willWe behave in already predetermined meansCrime is not a product of free choiceIt is the opposite from classical it is already determined from the disposition of people You cannot prevent crime through punishmentWhen you commit crime you arent really doing it something is pushing you to do itYou want to get to the root of the problem biological psychological or socialPunishment wont get you to the root of the problemPunishment is only a band aid solution to crimeIntelligence rationality freewill and crimeBeccariaThere are 3 places from which we draw guidance and reason 1Revelation religion2Natural lawnatural JusticeLocke and Hobbes3Positive LawHobbes and LockeHas a similar concern to the one that Locke hasthe basis of all positive law comes from natural Law Every piece of manmade law must be in relation to positive law We as people have rights as much of the power that we give the sovereign what concerns Beccaria is that we have given to you a particular amount of power and what you do with it is not in the good of the public The expectations for both Beccaria and Locke are the same
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