Class Notes (834,807)
Canada (508,727)
Economics (965)
ECO1302 (97)
Brett F. (4)
Lecture

Economics 5-Supply and Demand

5 Pages
75 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics
Course
ECO1302
Professor
Brett F.
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 5: Supply and Demand Moving to Macroeconomic Aggregates  Aggregate demand (AD)  =  is the relationship between the quantity of domestic  product that is being demanded and the overall price level (cost of living)  Aggregate supply (AS)  =  is the relationship between the quantity of domestic  product that is being supplied and the overall price level  The overall price level can be thought as the cost of living Major concerns of macroeconomics   Inflation:   A sustained increase in the general price level.  AD Þ  price level    Unemployment:   ˉAD Þ unemployment   Growth:   GDP  = GROWTH AND AD and/or AS  Þ  GROWTH   [Financial Stability? Equality of Opportunity?Environmental Sustainability?]  Gross Domestic Product o Money as the Measuring Rod: Real vs. Nominal GDP o GDP  =  sum of the money values of all final goods and services produced in  the domestic economy and sold on organized markets within the year o Nominal GDP (GDP in current dollars) = values each good and service at the  price at which it was actually sold during the year. Drawback of Nominal GDP:  it changes when prices change even if there is no change in  actual production.  Solution:  calculate real GDP or GDP in constant dollars.  Real GDP is calculated by valuing outputs of different years at common prices.  Therefore, real GDP is a far better measure than nominal GDP of changes in total  output.  o A recession is when real GDP is declining. o A convention is that a recession occurs when real GDP declines for at least two  consecutive quarters (six months). But this is just a convention. What gets counted in GDP?  Only goods and services produced within the year  Only final goods and services (intermediate goods, purchased for use in producing  another good are excluded)  Only production within the geographic boundaries of Canada                                       The Economy on a Roller Coaster Growth, but with Fluctuations:  Canada has seen significant fluctuations in economic growth, unemployment, and  inflation.  Before WWII, the business cycle was particularly strong, the worst episode being  the Great Depression of the 1930s.  The extent to which greater macro stability is due to a larger role for the public  sector is debated The Great Depression  A worldwide event most severe decline in economic activity  Caused a much­needed revolution in  economic thinking  Until the 1930s, the prevailing economic theory held that a capitalist economy  could cure recessions or inflations by itself  The Great Depression led John Maynard Keynes, one of the world’s most  renowned economists, to write The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and  Money (1936).  Before that Keynes was known for his book The Economic Consequences of the  Peace (1919), his huge Treatise on Money (1930), and his involvement in politics.   He was also part of the Bloomsbury group, a group of intellectuals, artists,  writers, that introduced Sigmund Freud to England, and one of which was  Virginia Woolf. Keynes believed that:  The economy did not naturally gravitate toward smooth growth and high levels of  employment  A pessimistic outlook could lead business firms and consumers to curtail their  spending plans  The economy could then be condemned to years of stagnation  In terms of the AD­AS framework, Keynes suggested that there were times when  the AD curve shifted inward by large amounts.  The co
More Less

Related notes for ECO1302

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit