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Lecture 11

Lecture 11
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Department
Philosophy
Course
PHI3170
Professor
Daniel Kofman
Semester
Fall

Description
Oct 22, 2013 Zagzebski's: 2 accident account of Gettier problem 1st accident= usually reliable justification fails or is inadequate i.e. Belief that the Ford was owned by Jones, yet it was not i.e. Barn Case...assuming all of the barn like structures are really barns 2nd accident= belief happens to be true anyway i.e. Happens to be acid in the dish...even though it is red dye paper i.e. I happen to be looking at the 1 real barn Claim on Gettier inevitability: As long as the relationship between truth & justification is not unviable (doesn't guarantee truth), the 1st accident is possible. Always possible to believe in something that is false and 2nd accident is possible. Given both are possible, Gettier examples are in escapable. [Alleged (an accusation), putative (to believe)] as long as the property that putatively converts true belief into knowledge is analyses in such a way that it is strongly linked with truth, but does not guarantee it, it will always be true. Alternative Strategies: Add 4th condition OR Strengthen "J" (justification) **It is not possible to avoid GCE's & Gettier counter examples are inescapable. Internalism: Accident of good luck cancels accident of bad luck Externalism: Either "reliability", "warrant", "method" is or isn't fallible. If so, impossible to have accidents (specifically the 1st accident). If not, hardly any knowledge b/c many of our justifications are good but not perfect. As long as the truth is never assured by the conditions which make the state justified, there will be situations which a false belief is justified. I have argued that with this common, in fact, almost universal assumption, Gettier cases will never go away. Conclusion: They will never go away because there is always some luck involved in 1st accident [i.e. it is litmus paper]...it follows that when you are not subject to an accident, that it is also luck. Analysis
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