Class Notes (834,991)
Canada (508,850)
Psychology (4,048)
PSY3122 (204)
Lecture

1- Introduction to Sexology.docx

8 Pages
135 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY3122
Professor
Catherine Plowright
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 1 Introduction to Sexology Human Sexuality: is involved in what we do, but it is also what we are. It is an identification, an activity, a drive, a biological and  emotional process, an outlook, and an expression of the self. It is an important factor in every relationship and ever human endeavor  from business to politics. Different Cultures Mangaia th • Polynesian island that was studied by Marshall in the 20  century • Sex positive culture ▯ one’s status us based on sexual ability • Children are taught about sexuality  and are encouraged to do it from a young age ▯ 8 years old - Taught to self­stimulate until orgasm  Males:  taught to manually achieve orgasm, thrust, control orgasm to last 15 minutes, to give pleasure and to control  their ejaculation  Females: taught to move hips to stimulate rhythm and increase orgasm • By age 13, teens participate in “night crawling” 3 times a night on average until married - During this, boys go out at night and sleep with various girls night after night - Boys and girls have sex until the age of about the age of 19/20 - Purpose is to sleep with as many people as possible in order to find the person who you are most sexually compatible  with = marriage  Believe you need to have the right foundation (hot sex) to have a successful marriage  Most people are married in their 20s  Claim love will blossom from the right foundation = process that is grown • Culture = sexually expressive Inis Beag th • Studied in the late 20  century by John Cowan Messenger • Not the real name = purpose is to protect the identity of the island because people from the Western civilization came and  spread STIs • Culture was greatly Roman Catholic – somewhere off the coast of Ireland - No divorce due to religious beliefs • No knowledge of any sexual acts including manual stimulation, oral sex, deep kissing, etc - No sex of any kind prior to marriage • Biologically no different from other cultures and societies • Only position permitted was missionary and it was done with the clothes on - Sexual intercourse was treated by both sexes as a necessary evil which must be endured for the sake of reproduction • No nudity of any kind was permitted = unacceptable/sinful - Nudity is detested – a sin to see a man with his shoes off - Breast­feeding was avoided • Believed sex will reduce bodily energy and deplete one’s health • Culture = sexually repressed The Dani • People in West New Guinea were studied by Higer • Sex consumes energy whether it be sexually expression or repression - Only society that put very little energy into anything – truly indifferent - Apathetic attitude to everything in genera  No wars, hatred, achievement, excitement = very laid back society • No sex before marriage • No sex after marriage for a few years (2 years) • No sex after child birth for 4­6 years • No birth control = low fertility rate because not having sex often • No alternative outlets – prostitution, porn, masturbation • Culture = sexually indifferent attitude Divergent in Sexual Expression “Sex Script Theory” – John Gagnon and William Simon • It is essentially a device for guiding sexual behavior - Help us recognize what is sexual and help us regulate sex - Guideline for appropriate sexual behavior and sexual encounters  Sexual behaviors and encounters then become learned interactions - They differ historically, culturally and geographically • Thought as an actor that doesn’t know their lines and as a result internalizes their parts – becoming one with the character - Become what we portray • Basic script stays intact, but can be adjusted and modified - All societies have some regulation about incest and some idea about the age of consent  Ontario – by law incest is against the law and 1/3 girls and ¼ boys will be sexually abused, usually by someone in  their family ▯ not following the script • Concepts - Who, where, what, when and why History of Sex in Western Society Ancient Egyptians • Positive, natural, and open experience/attitude of sex • Mostly sex positive = sex is a natural process with ritual attachment - Preferred position was women on top and men on bottom  Just as goddesses are in the sky and the gods on the ground • Dominated by religious believes • Males were sexually privileged = double standard by class and sex - Men could commit adultery but women could not • Pharaohs (male and female) were buried with their gold sex toys (such as dildos),  middle class people were buried with silver  sex toys and the peasants with their wooden toys - Heighten sexual interest • Script was that sex was used for procreation Ancient Hebrew • Monotheistic view ▯ only believe in one God • Positive view of marriage and of sex in marriage - Sex in marriage was seen as a devotion to god through pleasure in joy • Women were more sexual in nature and male had to bring women to orgasm - Sex was for procreation and pleasure • Sex is the wife’s privilege and the man’s responsibility - Husband must give pleasure and was not allowed to withhold sex from his wife • Important to have sex with women who were infertile, pregnant, etc so that they know they are still valuable • Holy act which brings harmony in the home especially on the Sabbath Ancient Greeks • Gods were a “horny” bunch and the horniness was embedded in society • Religiously based with a lot of sexual lust • Naturalism: everything is explained through laws of nature rather than religious or supernatural means • Men’s bodies were idealized = slim and muscular was the ideal - There was an emphasis on appearance, beauty and moderation • Homosexuality was not encouraged or acknowledge, but it happened (approved) - Sparta = men would have sex with each other to build a stronger bond (bonding ritual) Ancient Romans • Highly restricted, but eventually gained a more permissive direction • 10 BC  “Art of Love” was a popular book – sex guide ▯ condemned • Increase in prostitution and odd sexual behaviors/acts • Gladiators were raped by animals (i.e. lions) in the coliseum▯ sex negative • Entertainers of any gender were assumed to be sexually available - Gladiators were sexually glamorous - Slaves lacked legal personhood and were vulnerable to sexual exploitation Christianity • Promoted celibacy (through Jesus) • Appearance of mind­body dualism • Sexual negativity was pioneered by the disciples  of Jesus • St.Paul talked about asceticism = rejection of bodily pleasure “repressive” - Chastity and celibacy became known - Better to marry not to burn and that men should not touch women Middle Ages • Very restrictive attitude towards sex • Doctrines in church were repressive - Church dictated how you were supposed to have sex - Anything other than the missionary positive, was considered unnatural and therefore a sin  Anal and oral sex were sins because they could only be practiced for pleasure • St. Augustine came up with the idea of sexual guilt and original sin • Chastity for priest and nuns because sex for pleasure is considered forbidden - Celibacy was the ideal way to conduct one’s life and sex was condoned only as part of a marriage – even then was only  allowed for procreation • 12  century: divorce was forbidden • Projection: putting emotions on another person “what is on me, but that I can’t accept” - Usually placed on victims and the weak ▯ women, poor people, the young - Witches were targeted as a result of all repressed sexual anxiety  Malleus maleficarum tells of how to detect witches. If she’s a witch, she’s burned  If she’s convicted of being one and doesn’t confess to being one, weights are tied to her and she’s placed into a body  of water.   If she drowned, she was innocent. If she doesn’t drown within 5 minutes, she’s a witch and she’s removed from the  water and burned at the stake. • Pendulum swings again in the late middle ages regarding sex attitudes among richer women • For the first time, women are being put on pedestals and seen as desirable but unattainable (think Rapunzel). This laid the  foundation for the romantic love we know today.  • Later people started seeking sexual expression - Courtly love is associate
More Less

Related notes for PSY3122

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit